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USS Rochester CA-124 - History

USS Rochester CA-124 - History


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USS Rochester CA-124

Rochester III
(CA-124: dp. 13,700; 1. 674'11", b. 70'10", dr. 20'7", s. 33 k.
cpl. 1,142; a. 9 8", 12 5", 48 40mm., 20 20mm., 4 ac.;
cl. Oregon City)

The third Rochester (CA-124) was laid down 29 May 1944 by Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass.; launched 28 August 1945; sponsored by Mrs. M. Herbert Eisenhart, wife of the president of Bauseh & Lomb Optieal Co., Rochester, N.Y. and commissioned 20 December 1946 at the Boston Navy Yard, Capt. Harry A. Guthrie in command.

Rochester departed Provincetown, Mass., 22 February 1947 for shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. By the end of April she was at Philadelphia, ready to commence nine extended naval reserve training cruises which took her north to Caseo Bay and south to the Caribbean.

Upon completion of her ninth reserve training cruise in the second week of January 1948, Rochester prepared for Mediterranean service. Departing Philadelphia 20 February, she arrived at Gibraltar 1 March, and became flagship for Adm. Forrest Sherman, Commander, 6th Fleet. In additiontocalling at several ports, the cruiser waited out the events of the Palestiniancrisis, at Suda Bay on the northern coast of Crete. She completed her tour June 14th; Admiral Sherman shifted his flag to light cruiser Fargo, and Rochester departed for Philadelphia the 15th, arriving 27 June. Rochester then resumed reserve training duty, making cruises to Bermuda, to New Brunswick, and to Jamaica.

After shore bombardment exercises at Bloodsworth Island in early October, Rochester reported to the South Boston Naval Shipyard for her first overhaul which included removal of her catapults and conversion of her aviation section from seaplanes to helicopters. She operated in the Caribbean and along the North Atlantic coast until she stood out from Narragansett Bay on 5 January 1950 and steamed for the west coast and a new homeport, Long Beach, Calif.

In April 1950 Rochester departed I,ong Beach for the South pacific. After calling at Pearl Harbor, she embarked Adm. Arthur W. Radford, Commander-in Chief, Pacific Fleet for a tour of the U.S. Trust Territories. Upon completion of this tour, Viee Adm. A. D. Struble, Commander, 7th Fleet, was received on board at Guam. Rochester then set course for the Philippine Islands.

She was at Sangley Point, Philippine Islands, when President Truman ordered the 7th Fleet mto action, and was operating with Carrier Task Force 77 on the mOrning of 3 July 1950 when the first U.N. air raids against North Korean forces were launched. On 18 and 19 July 1950 Rochester supported

landings on Pohang Dong by the Army's 1st Cavalry Division. She continued to serve with Task Force 77 until 25 August 1950.

Rochester's gunB provided support for the troops that landed at Inehon on 13 September in the operation that prompted General MacArthur's proud signal that "the Navy and Marines have never shown more brightly than this morning."

During the months of October, November, and December Rochester operated continuously along the Korean coast for 81 days, providing gunfire support to troops ashore and serving as a mobile helicopter base. Helos were kept aloft eonstantly to aid the minesweepers in opening the ports of Changjon Koje, Wonsan, Hungnam, and Songjin. In addition to destroying six mines by her own gunfire, the cruiser eontrolled naval air operations in the Wonsan area during the 10 days preeeeding the arrival of landing forces. Her helicopters also aided in the rescue of survivors from the minesweepers Pirate and Pledge, sunk in Wonsan Harbor.

During 198 days of operations against the Communist forces in Korea, she steamed over 25,000 miles and expended 3,265 eight-inch and 2,339 five-ineh projectiles. Rochester then called at Sasebo, Japan, and on 10 January 1951 headed for home, arriving at Long Beach 30 January. Ten days later she steamed for her scheduled yard overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, San Francisco, which took her through May

During refresher training in the Long Beach-San Diego area, Rochester assisted in training crews for the ships that were being taken out of mothballs. She departed Long Beach 27 August 1951 for training in the Hawaiian area, after which she steamed for Yokosuka, Japan, arriving there 21 November. On 28 November, she blasted Kosong with more than 250 rounds of high explosive.

She then ranged the entire northeastern Korean coastline bombarding ground targets, while her helicopters flew rescue missions for Task Force 77 aviators. Into the spring she continued harassment and interdiction missions along the eastern coast of Korea.

In early April 1952 she spent a week as flagship of the Blockading and Escorting Forces on Korea's west coast, and in late April she steamed for her homeport. May through October was given over to in-port time at Long Beach and to coastal training operations. In November the cruiser departed for another WestPae tour, arriving back on station as a unit of Task Group 77.1 (Support Group) in the waters off eastern Korea 7 December.

After spending the winter months in harassment and interdiction missions and other ouerations with the fast carrier task force, Rochester steamed home, arriving Long Beach, 6 April 1953.

During her regularly scheduled yard period at Mare Island 4 May to 7 September 1953, her 20mm. and 40mm. batteries were replaced with 3-inch 50 rapid-fire guns. Coastal refresher training was followed by a 5 January 1954 departure for WestPae. The normal exercises and port calls of a WestPac deployment ended with her departure from Yokosuka 29 May for the west coast.

In February 1955 Rochester served on her fifth WestPac deployment, completing that cruise 6 August and arriving at her homeport the 22d. An overhaul at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard commenced 19 November 1955 and was eompleted 7 March 1956. Thenee eame refresher training and preparations for yet another WestPae deployment. This sixth Pacific tour commenced 29 May when Rochester and her escorts stood out of Long Beach. It was 16 December when the ships returned to homeport.

The first week of June 1957 found Rochester in San Francisco, where she acted as flagship for Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz as he reviewed the 1st Fleet. Returning to Long Beach the 18th, she resumed local operations and exercises until her departure on 3 September for her seventh WestPae deployment. She returned to Long Beach 24 March 1958. Two more WestPae deployments followed, 6 January to 17 June 1959 and 5 April to 29 October 1960.

Rochester was ordered to report to the Commander, Bremerton Group, pacific Reserve Fleet on 15 April 1961 for inactivation. She departed Long Beach 12 April, reported to the Puget Sound Naval ShipYard, and she was placed out of commission, in reserve, 15 August 1961. She remained at Bremerton until struck from the Navy list on 1 October 1973 and scrapped.

Rochester received six battle stars for Korean war service.


USS Rochester CA-124 - History

USS Rochester , a 13,700-ton Oregon City class heavy cruiser, was built at Quincy, Massachusetts. Commissioned in December 1946, She performed her first three years' service in the Atlantic, making one deployment to the Mediterranean in 1948. Early in 1950, Rochester shifted to the Pacific, and was soon sent to the Far East to become Seventh Fleet flagship. She served there until January 1951, taking an active part in Korean War operations and the Formosa Straits patrol.

Rochester made two more Korean War combat tours during 1951-53. She was then modernized, receiving new anti-aircraft guns and other equipment. The rest of the 1950s saw her return to the Far East for five more Seventh Fleet deployments. Rochester 's ninth, and final, Western Pacific cruise took place in April-October 1960. She was decommissioned in August 1961 and spent the next dozen years in reserve at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. USS Rochester was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in October 1973 and was subsequently sold for scrapping.

This page features portrait views of USS Rochester .

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photographed in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, 19 December 1946, the day before her commissioning ceremonies.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 97KB 740 x 615 pixels

Photograph dated 27 June 1950. However, radar antenna on foremast is of a type that was replaced prior to the ship's 1950 Western Pacific deployment, indicating that this view was taken during the later 1940s.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 100KB 740 x 615 pixels

En route to the Shimonoseki Strait, Japan, after operations off the east coast of Korea. Probably taken during her December 1952 -- March 1953 Korean War combat tour.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 106KB 740 x 610 pixels

Photographed in 1951-53, prior to her May-September 1953 overhaul.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 98KB 740 x 615 pixels

Departing the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, 20 September 1953, following overhaul. She has been fitted with 3"/50 twin automatic gun mounts, replacing the 40mm guns she carried from 1946 to 1953.
Tugs Dekaury (YTB-178) --at left-- and Awatobi (YTB-264) -- alongside her starboard side, forward-- are assisting her.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 99KB 740 x 584 pixels

En route to Saigon, Vietnam, 17 February 1954.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 129KB 740 x 565 pixels

Underway in San Francisco Bay, California, at the time of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz' review of the First Fleet, 13 June 1957.

Courtesy of Robert M. Cieri, 1982.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 101KB 740 x 595 pixels

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."


USS Rochester CA-124 - History

This page features views of USS Rochester 's Korean War activities during 1950-53

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Senior U.S. and British naval officers confer on board Rochester , flagship of the U.S. Seventh Fleet, during the early days of the Korean War. The original photograph is dated 1 July 1950.
Those present are (from left to right):
Captain A.D. Torlesse, RN, Commanding Officer of HMS Triumph
Rear Admiral John M. Hoskins, USN, Commander, Carrier Group, Seventh Fleet
Vice Admiral Arthur D. Struble, USN, Commander, Seventh Fleet and
Rear Admiral Sir William G. Andrewes, RN, Commander, British Commonwealth Forces.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 107KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

USS Valley Forge (CV-45) (left) and
USS Philippine Sea (CV-47) (center)

At their anchorages at Sasebo, Japan, during Korean War resupply activities, 23 August 1950.
The ship in the right distance is USS Rochester (CA-124).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 71KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Inchon Operation, September 1950

Flag conference on board USS Rochester (CA-124), flagship of Joint Task Force Seven, during the Inchon operation.
Those present are (from left to right):
Rear Admiral James H. Doyle, USN, Commander, Task Force 90,
Vice Admiral Arthur D. Struble, USN, Commander, Joint Task Force Seven, and
Rear Admiral John M. Higgins, USN, Commander, Task Group 90.6.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 107KB 740 x 620 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Rear Admiral James H. Doyle, USN ,
Commander, Task Force 90

Congratulates four sailors who have just received the Silver Star Medal for service as coxwains of LCVP landing craft during the Inchon Invasion. Taken during ceremonies on board USS Rochester (CA-124).
See Photo # 80-G-423716 (Complete Caption) for identities of the medal winners and other information.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 87KB 740 x 535 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Inchon Operation, September 1950

View of the transport area, looking southwestward from over Inchon, with Sowolmi Do in the foreground. The original photograph is dated 29 September 1950, two weeks after the Inchon assault and the day that liberation ceremonies took place in Seoul.
USS Rochester (CA-124), flagship of Joint Task Force Seven, is in the center.
USS Mount McKinley (AGC-7), flagship of Task Force 90, is the nearest of the three ships at left, seen straight out from the Sowolmi Do seawall.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 72KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Hungnam Evacuation, December 1950

Shipping off Hungnam, 10 December 1950, as the evacuation of troops and supplies commenced.
USS Rochester (CA-124) is at right, with transports and merchant ships beyond and to the left. A LCVP is maneuvering in the center foreground.
Photographed from USS Mount McKinley (AGC-7), flagship of Task Force 90.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 79KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Note: For three photographs that some sources credit as representing a bombardment by USS Rochester , see the following images: Photo # 80-G-422474, Photo # 80-G-422473 and Photo # 80-G-422471.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."


[Photos] Views of 1954 Saigon-Cho Lon From a USS Rochester Sailor

The USS Rochester CA-124 was a heavy cruiser that was first launched after World War II.

Nicknamed the "gray ghost of the Korean Coast," the cruiser was used extensively in the Korean War. When it docked in Saigon in 1953 as a gesture of "goodwill" after returning from combat, the USS Rochester CA-124 was the largest ship to ever visit the city.

In January 1954, the year after the Korean War ended, the cruiser departed from Long Beach, California to head to the West Pacific region. According to the content of the ship's cruise book in 1954, it stopped at Pearl Harbor, Manila, Singapore and Bangkok before arriving in Saigon on February 17. The crew stayed there for three days before departing for Yokosuka.

According to Redsvn, it was also during its stop in Saigon in 1954 that this series of photographs were taken by an unknown sailor who served on the ship.


USS Rochester CA-124 - History

Apr - Oct 1960 Westpac Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

A great part of naval history.

You would be purchasing the USS Rochester CA 124 cruise book during the 1960. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the headlines in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Hawaii , Guam , Japan , Okinawa, Sasebo , Hong Kong and the Philippines .
  • Cruise Itinerary (Ports and Dates)
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Many Department Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 549 pictures on 183 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Cruiser during this time period.


USS Rochester (CA-124)

Die USS Rochester (CA-124) war ein im Dezember 1946 in Dienst gestellter Schwerer Kreuzer der United States Navy. Das Schiff gehörte der Oregon-City-Klasse an und kam in seiner Laufbahn unter anderem im Koreakrieg zum Einsatz. Im August 1961 wurde die Rochester ausgemustert und in die Reserveflotte verlegt. Dort lag das Schiff 13 Jahre lang, ehe es 1974 zum Abbruch ging.

4 Propeller, über 4 Dampfturbinen angetrieben 120.000 PS

Die Rochester wurde am 8. April 1944 in der Werft von Bethlehem Steel auf Kiel gelegt und lief am 28. August 1945 vom Stapel. Wie seine Schwesterschiffe erlebte der für den Pazifikkrieg konzipierte Kreuzer den aktiven Kriegseinsatz nicht mehr, die Indienststellung des Schiffes erfolgte am 20. Dezember 1946 unter dem Kommando von Captain Harry Aloysius Guthrie.

Nach bis zum Januar 1948 andauernden Testfahrten wurde die Rochester ins Mittelmeer verlegt, wo sie nach ihrer Ankunft in Gibraltar im März 1948 als Flaggschiff von Admiral Forrest P. Sherman diente. Der Kreuzer verblieb bis Juni desselben Jahres im Mittelmeer, ehe sie zum Heimathafen Philadelphia zurückkehrte. Es folgten weitere Übungseinsätze vor Bermuda, New Brunswick und Jamaika. Im Oktober 1948 wurde die Rochester erstmals modernisiert und erhielt neben diversen Umbauten wie der Entfernung ihrer Flugzeugkatapulte vier Sikorsky S-51, welche die zuvor an Bord befindlichen Wasserflugzeuge ersetzten. Nach erneuten Übungseinsätzen wurde im Januar 1950 Long Beach zum neuen Heimathafen des Schiffes.

Im April 1950 brach die Rochester zu einer Fahrt nach Pearl Harbor auf, wo sie hochrangige Gäste wie Admiral Arthur W. Radford empfing. Anschließend setzte sie Kurs auf die Naval Station Sangley Point auf den Philippinen. Dort wurde das Schiff für den Einsatz im Koreakrieg der Task Force 77, mit der am 3. Juli 1950 die ersten Luftangriffe auf nordkoreanische Streitkräfte durchgeführt wurden. Vom 18. auf den 19. Juli 1950 unterstützte die Rochester Einheiten der 1st Cavalry Division bei der Landung vor Pohang. Auch bei der Operation Chromite im September desselben Jahres gab das Schiff den landenden US-Truppen Feuerunterstützung.

Am Morgen des 17. September 1950 wurde die Rochester vor der kleinen Insel Wolmido nahe Incheon von zwei nordkoreanischen Flugzeugen des Typs Jakowlew Jak-9 und Iljuschin Il-2 angegriffen, die vier Bomben auf das Schiff warfen. Eine dieser Bomben traf den am Heck des Kreuzers befindlichen Kran, detonierte jedoch nicht. Bei einem anschließenden Gegenangriff des britischen Kreuzers HMS Jamaica gelang der Abschuss der Iljuschin Il-2. [1]

Von Oktober bis Dezember 1950 folgten weitere Einsätze der Rochester zur Feuerunterstützung. Darunter vor Geoje, Wŏnsan, Hŭngnam und Kimch’aek. Zudem zerstörte das Schiff insgesamt sechs gegnerische Seeminen und evakuierte am 10. und 12. Oktober die Besatzungsmitglieder der durch Minen versenkten Minenabwehrfahrzeuge USS Pirate (AM-275) und USS Pledge (AM-277) im Hafen von Wŏnsan. Der Einsatz der Rochester endete im Januar 1951 nach 198 Tagen.

Nach Übungseinsätzen vor Hawaii und Japan kehrte das Schiff im November 1951 nach Korea zurück und beschoss dort feindliche Stellungen in der zur Provinz Kangwŏn-do gehörenden Region Kosŏng. In den folgenden Monaten nahm die Rochester an weiteren Einsätzen teil, in denen sie Feuerunterstützung gab und ihre Bordhubschrauber Rettungsmissionen für Piloten der Task Force 77 flogen. Mit Ausnahme einer Pause von Mai bis Oktober 1952 zu Übungszwecken und zur Überholung in Long Beach blieb das Schiff bis April 1953 vor Korea im Einsatz.

Die folgenden Jahre verbrachte die Rochester mit Übungseinsätzen und Hafenbesuchen in internationalen Gewässern. Eine besondere Rolle hielt der Kreuzer im Juni 1957 inne, als er kurzzeitig als Flaggschiff des Flottenadmirals Chester W. Nimitz bei dessen Besuch in San Francisco diente. Es gab Pläne, die Rochester wie ihr Schwesterschiff USS Albany (CA-123) zu einem Raketenkreuzer umzurüsten, was jedoch verworfen wurde. Stattdessen beendete das Schiff am 15. August 1961 seine aktive Dienstzeit und wurde zur Reserveflotte nach Bremerton. Nach der Streichung aus dem Naval Vessel Register am 1. Oktober 1973 wurde die Rochester im Juli 1974 zum Abbruch an Zidell Explorations in Portland verkauft.

Für ihre Verdienste im Koreakrieg erhielt die Rochester sechs Battle Stars, die Korean Service Medal sowie die Navy Occupation Service Medal.


File:Crew members standing an alert watch on a 40mm anti-aircraft battery onboard USS Rochester (CA 124), flagship of the Seventh Fleet during current operations in the Formosa area.jpg

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Just In: USS Rochester ship newspaper 1930-1933

We found an extraordinary five-volume bound set of the official newspaper of the United States Ship “The Rochester” that span from Aug. 23, 1930 to March 25, 1933. The collection was originally compiled by the ship newspaper’s editor, W.H. Humphrey, whose family we have been working with.

There are three volumes of “The Rocky” bound in green boards and two in brown. Some issues are duplicates but the set of five tells the full story of the lives of the men and the mission of the ship. This is truly an exceptional find that should be of tremendous interest to military collectors, historians, descendants of the U.S.S. Rochester and anyone with a love for the U.S. Navy. We have thoroughly enjoyed reading the set and are now making them available for others to love. Find the USS Rochester newspaper collection in our Orion’s Attic eBay store in the history section of our books department.

The opening page of the first green volume explains the purpose of creating the newspaper. Datelined Balboa, Canal Zone and headlined “From the Captain,” it reads as follows:

The Captain is much pleased to have the opportunity to extend greetings and best wishes to “The Rocky”. This paper will afford means of broadcasting information about the activities and employment of the ship and her personnel. It will help to keep our families in closer touch with us, and will let other ships know that we are alive and on the job. It is hoped that the Rochester’s paper will have the support and help of all hands. In welcoming then, this paper, the Captain extends his compliments and best wishes to the editors and publishers and through them to the officers and crew of the good ship Rochester. He has been much gratified at the loyal spirit of cooperation so far displayed by everyone and hopes the “The Rocky” will be a strong influence toward their continuing loyalty, contentment and efficiency.

Every page of USS Rochester newspaper is packed with information and insight.

The ship was captained at the time by L.P. Treadwell and commanded by L.J. Oliver.

These well-preserved editions provide mountains of insight and information on its crew and their travels. The time periods they cover are:

Green Volumes

Vol. 1: Aug. 23, 1930 to June 27, 1931

Vol. 2: July 4, 1931 to June 25, 1932

Vol. 3: July 2, 1932 to March 31, 1933

Brown Volumes (Issues start in back and move forward in time as you go from back to front)

Vol. 1: May 2, 1931 to June 25, 1932

Vol. 2: July 2, 1932 to March 25, 1933

In broad strokes, these ship newspapers include a fantastic humor section with some good old fashioned clean jokes that are just as funny today as they were then, information and essays about Navy sports, the moral code of the Navy, poetry, science, general military news, Navy news, editorials, profiles on ship personnel, crossword puzzles and so much more.


Description

We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy cruiser CA 124 USS Rochester embroidered hat.

For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

Our CA 124 USS Rochester embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


Watch the video: COUNTRYBALLS. Russian History (June 2022).


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