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Exultant- AM-441 - History

Exultant- AM-441 - History


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Exultant II

(AM-441: dp. 620, 1. 172', b. 36', dr. 10', s. 16 k.
cpl. 74, a. 1 40 mm.; cl. Agile)

The second Exultant (AM-441) was launched 6 June 1953 by Higgins, Inc., New Orleans, La., sponsored by Miss A. Brooks, and commissioned 22 June 1954, Lieutenant R. T. Gregory in command. She was reclassified MSO-441 on 7 February 1955.

Exultant first tied up at Charleston, her home port and headquarters for the Mine Force, Atlantic Fleet 23 July 1954. Along with the coastwise training operations vital to maintaining her readiness, she cruised to the Mediterranean to serve with the 6th Fleet in 1965, 1967-1968, and 1969-1960. During all of these tours of duty, she exercised with ships of other NATO navies, joined in fleet operations, and visited a large variety of Mediterranean ports.

In both 1966 and 1967, Exultant spent a month in northern waters, in 1966 exercising with minesweepers of the Royal Canadian Navy out of Halifax, Nova Scotia, and in 1957, participating in cold weather sweeping operations out of Argentia, Newfoundland. Her other activities through July of 1960 included fleet operations in the Caribbean, as well as individual training there, amphibious exercises on the beaches of North Carolina, and participation in experimental operations in the development of mine warfare.

On 12 August 1960 while underway off the east coast, Exultant suffered extensive interior damage from a flash fire in her engineering spaces. Valiant performance of duty by the minesweeper's damage control parties, and gallant help from Nimble (MSO-459) extinguished the flames and enabled Exultant to return safely to port. Five of Exultant'~ crew lost their lives in the blaze.


Derrick Adams’s Art Celebrates Black Life at its Most Exultant

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

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Ideas pour from Derrick Adams, and what’s surprising is how many of them work out. A couple of years ago, around the time that he was making his Floater paintings, depicting Black people lounging on swimming-pool inflatables, he thought, Why not start a creative persons’ retreat where the only obligation would be to appreciate leisure? His eight-bedroom retreat opens next year in Baltimore, his hometown. Struck by The Green Book, the guide compiled by postal worker Victor Hugo Green beginning in 1936 to help Black travelers find safe amenities, Derrick initiated Sanctuary, a series of exhibitions located in and inspired by the cities covered by the guide. He wanted to emphasize the accomplishment of the book, not the racism that made it necessary.

Adams, 51, a genial, laid-back dynamo whose multidisciplinary art practice spans painting, sculpture, collage, sound installations, video, performance, and fashion, gained widespread acclaim with “Live and in Color,” his 2014 show at New York’s Tilton Gallery. The show recycled images from early sitcoms, game shows, and dramas in collages that were placed in what looked like a vintage television set. The Floater series came next, more than 100 works of Black subjects relaxing on inflatable swans, unicorns, and other fantasy fauna. “I wanted to occupy a different space from all the artists who were speaking on issues of race and trauma and oppression,” Adams says in a Zoom conversation last month. He’s in his Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn, studio, a 2,500-square-foot former auto-body shop I’m in Rhode Island. “People couldn’t exist if they lived in constant grief. My work is focused on the idea of how crucial it is for Black people to think of leisure as a radical act.” The matchless independent curator Francesco Bonami, who has worked on projects with Adams, tells me, “He addresses important and tragic issues without preaching, but at the same time he serves guilt to the white viewer as an appetizer on a designer plate.”

“People couldn’t exist if they lived in constant grief."

This month, Adams’s “Style Variations” is one of two opening exhibitions at Salon 94’s palatial new venue on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Adams, says Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, Salon 94’s founder, is “the right vantage point from which to start a new venture, post-COVID, new administration.” Ten of his magisterial Beauty World paintings dominate the main gallery: larger-than-life mannequin heads, transformed by sculpture-like wigs and evocative makeup. Blocks of color combine with semiabstract forms that channel Cubist painting and African sculpture.

That, of course, is not all Adams is doing. He is also working on a show for the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle, inspired by Patrick Kelly, the young Black fashion designer who died in 1990. The latest version of Sanctuary, his Green Book work, opened in February at the Momentary, a contemporary arm of Crystal Bridges in Bentonville, Arkansas. And he’s been collaborating with Dave Guy, trumpeter for the Roots, on a series of short films. “For Black men, joy isn’t at the forefront,” Guy tells me, “but Derrick brings it to his art and daily life. Who else could make a black unicorn look so cool? Only Derrick can, because he is one.” Adams may be the hardest-working leisure lover on earth.

Musicians and other creative people were a big part of Adams’s life when he was growing up in Baltimore. His parents both had administrative jobs with the state, but after the marriage broke up, his mother married the funk-and-jazz drummer Guy Davidson, who had a studio in the basement. His mother’s first cousin is Def Jam’s Russell Simmons, and as a teenager, Derrick often visited Russell and his brother Danny, a painter, in New York. In junior college he came across a book on Jacob Lawrence, and though he knew nothing about art history, the encounter had a profound effect on him. The book stated that Lawrence had taught at Pratt. “And I was like, I’m going to this school,” Adams says.

At Pratt, he majored in art education. “I never felt art should be my main source of income,” he explains. (While in school, he also worked in retail for Phat Farm, his cousin Russell’s clothing line, where he learned that popular culture, commerce, and art were by no means incompatible.) He began teaching in elementary schools, and he’s been teaching ever since—he’s now on a tenure track at Brooklyn College. His best friend at Pratt was Mickalene Thomas, whom he still talks to every day. “At school, Derrick was an audacious creative leader,” she says. “Everyone gravitated to him. We have the best laughs—that deep, belly-​hurting laughter that makes you tear up slightly or tinkle.” In 1996, he went straight from Pratt to Rush Arts Gallery, the nonprofit Chelsea art space started by his cousin Danny and his two brothers, where for the next four years he worked as the manager and showed Ed Clark, Frank Bowling, Howardena Pindell, and Senga Nengudi, as well as other then-unknown older artists, and introduced newcomers such as Wangechi Mutu, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley. Feeling the need to concentrate more exclusively on his own work, he entered the graduate visual-arts program at Columbia, where he found himself the only Black student. This is when he began to focus on what was missing in the critical conversation. “I felt that white students should be more aware of the accomplishments of Black people as they’re learning about all those oppressive structures that were imposed upon them. They should also know that during these same times, Black people were getting Ph.D.s and attending college.” Adams was invited to join Dana Schutz and a small group of other Columbia grad students in a Brooklyn building they were converting into studio spaces. “It was incredible stopping by his studio,” Schutz remembers. “Each time he had a whole new body of work.”

We’re in Adams’s Bed-Stuy studio again, via Zoom, where he and his partner, Michael Chuapoco (a furniture designer), have just finished their first weekly session with a yoga instructor. Adams is dressed, as usual, in black, loose-fitting clothes, often from the New York design team Public School. Over that, he’s wearing what he calls a butcher apron and an antique gold coin from Bermuda on a chain around his neck. “He’s hella stylish!” his friend Marcus Samuelsson, head chef of the Red Rooster in Harlem and the just-opened outpost in Miami, tells me. Adams’s work hangs permanently in both Roosters. “I really love fashion,” Adams says, “and I’m inspired by designers.” He’s a firm believer in the proverb De gustibus non est disputandum—for him, taste has always been something not to be questioned. “I come from a neighborhood where people weren’t criticized for what they had on,” he says. “It was just, ‘This is me.’ ”

The studio is full of commanding new paintings. A majestic woman in a white dress and a floppy white hat one young boy embracing another a car passing a giant billboard that reads, juice. “I’m feeling really confident,” Adams says, “and I’ve decided I’m making the new work for a museum show—a four-week gallery show is not long enough.” The work is “like driving through a Black neighborhood,” he says. “It’s a world more than a neighborhood—and everyone knows when they drive through a Black neighborhood.”

The retreat that Adams plans to open a year from now is in a large Baltimore house that he’s restoring. He’s put in a pool, a greenhouse, a screening room, and studio spaces. Residents will be invited (you can’t apply) for up to four weeks at a time, and there will never be more than 10 of them. It’s not just for Black visual artists but also for Black writers, musicians, culinary people, “even entrepreneurs,” he tells me. He got the idea for his Last Resort, as he’s calling it, when he was invited to the Rauschenberg Residency in Captiva, Florida. “You can come and not do anything,” he tells me. “Everything is very loose.” He continues, “Artists create images that reflect certain ideals and conditions. A lot of my work is about leisure, and I thought, What if I make what I’m making art about—make it actual? Why don’t I just make it so it’s a real place? That will be my legacy.”


The Bride

Lady Diana Spencer, later known as the “People’s Princess,” was the first British citizen to marry an heir to the throne in over 300 years, though she was far from a commoner. Diana was the daughter of Edward John Spencer and Frances Ruth Burke Roche, the Viscount and Viscountess Althorp. Diana first met Charles, Prince of Wales𠅊 man 13 years her senior—when her family rented Queen Elizabeth II’s estate, Park House, during Diana’s childhood.

Charles briefly dated Diana’s older sister, Lady Sarah, before courting his future bride. He proposed to Diana with a 12-carat sapphire engagement ring surrounded by 14 solitaire diamonds after meeting Diana just 13 times. To the public, the whirlwind romance between the shy, 20-year-old kindergarten teacher and the crown prince was something out of a fairytale.

The wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer in St Paul&aposs Cathedral, July 29, 1981.

Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images


Contents

Year Links to the corresponding "year in baseball" or "Major League Baseball season" article
Leader Player with the highest number of strikeouts in the league
K Number of strikeouts [b]
Runner-up Player with the second-best strikeout total in the league
League Denoted only for players outside of the modern major leagues
Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
Year Leader K Team Runner-up K Ref
1876 Jim Devlin 122 Louisville Grays George Bradley 103 [33]
1877 Tommy Bond 170 Boston Red Caps Jim Devlin 141 [34]
1878 Tommy Bond 182 Boston Red Caps Will White 169 [35]
1879 John Montgomery Ward 239 Providence Grays Will White 232 [36]
1880 Larry Corcoran 268 Chicago White Stockings Jim McCormick 260 [37]
1881 George Derby 212 Detroit Wolverines Jim McCormick 178 [38]
1882 Charles Radbourn 201 Cleveland Spiders Jim McCormick 200 [39]
1883 Jim Whitney 345 Boston Beaneaters Charles Radbourn 315 [40]
1884 Charles Radbourn 441 Providence Grays Charlie Buffinton 417 [41]
1885 John Clarkson 308 Chicago White Stockings Mickey Welch 258 [42]
1886 Lady Baldwin 323 Detroit Wolverines John Clarkson 313 [43]
1887 John Clarkson 237 Chicago White Stockings Tim Keefe 189 [44]
1888 Tim Keefe 335 New York Giants John Clarkson 223 [45]
1889 John Clarkson 284 Boston Beaneaters Tim Keefe 225 [46]
1890 Amos Rusie 341 New York Giants Bill Hutchinson 289 [47]
1891 Amos Rusie 337 New York Giants Bill Hutchinson 261 [48]
1892 Bill Hutchinson 314 Chicago White Stockings
Amos Rusie 304 [49]
1893 Amos Rusie 208 New York Giants Brickyard Kennedy 107 [50]
1894 Amos Rusie 195 New York Giants Ted Breitenstein 140 [51]
1895 Amos Rusie 201 Cleveland Spiders Kid Nichols 148 [52]
1896 Cy Young 140 Cleveland Spiders Pink Hawley 137 [53]
1897 Doc McJames
Cy Seymour
156 Washington Senators
New York Giants
Joe Corbett 149 [54]
1898 Cy Seymour 239 New York Giants Doc McJames 178 [55]
1899 Noodles Hahn 145 Cincinnati Reds Cy Seymour 142 [56]
1900 Noodles Hahn 132 Cincinnati Reds Rube Waddell 130 [57]
1901 Noodles Hahn 239 Cincinnati Reds Bill Donovan 226 [58]
1902 Vic Willis 225 Boston Beaneaters Doc White 185 [59]
1903 Christy Mathewson 267 New York Giants Joe McGinnity 171 [60]
1904 Christy Mathewson 212 New York Giants Vic Willis 196 [61]
1905 Christy Mathewson 206 New York Giants Red Ames 198 [62]
1906 Fred Beebe 171 Chicago Cubs
St. Louis Cardinals
Francis "Big Jeff" Pfeffer 158 [63]
1907 Christy Mathewson 178 New York Giants Bob Ewing 147 [64]
1908 Christy Mathewson 259 New York Giants Nap Rucker 199 [65]
1909 Orval Overall 205 Chicago Cubs Nap Rucker 201 [66]
1910 Earl Moore 185 Philadelphia Phillies Christy Mathewson 184 [67]
1911 Rube Marquard 237 New York Giants Grover Cleveland Alexander 227 [68]
1912 Grover Cleveland Alexander 195 Philadelphia Phillies Claude Hendrix 176 [69]
1913 Tom Seaton 168 Philadelphia Phillies Jeff Tesreau 167 [70]
1914 Grover Cleveland Alexander 214 Philadelphia Phillies Jeff Tesreau 189 [71]
1915 Grover Cleveland Alexander 241 Philadelphia Phillies Jeff Tesreau 176 [72]
1916 Grover Cleveland Alexander 167 Philadelphia Phillies Larry Cheney 166 [73]
1917 Grover Cleveland Alexander 200 Philadelphia Phillies Hippo Vaughn 195 [74]
1918 Hippo Vaughn 148 Chicago Cubs Wilbur Cooper 117 [75]
1919 Hippo Vaughn 141 Chicago Cubs Hod Eller 137 [76]
1920 Grover Cleveland Alexander 173 Chicago Cubs Burleigh Grimes
Hippo Vaughn
131 [77]
1921 Burleigh Grimes 136 Brooklyn Robins Wilbur Cooper 134 [78]
1922 Dazzy Vance 134 Brooklyn Robins Wilbur Cooper 129 [79]
1923 Dazzy Vance 197 Brooklyn Robins Dolf Luque 151 [80]
1924 Dazzy Vance 262 Brooklyn Robins Burleigh Grimes 135 [81]
1925 Dazzy Vance 221 Brooklyn Robins Dolf Luque 140 [82]
1926 Dazzy Vance 140 Brooklyn Robins Charlie Root 127 [83]
1927 Dazzy Vance 184 Brooklyn Robins Charlie Root 145 [84]
1928 Dazzy Vance 200 Brooklyn Robins Pat Malone 155 [85]
1929 Pat Malone 166 Chicago Cubs Watty Clark 140 [86]
1930 Bill Hallahan 177 St. Louis Cardinals Dazzy Vance 173 [87]
1931 Bill Hallahan 159 St. Louis Cardinals Carl Hubbell 155 [88]
1932 Dizzy Dean 191 St. Louis Cardinals Carl Hubbell 137 [89]
1933 Dizzy Dean 199 St. Louis Cardinals Carl Hubbell 156 [90]
1934 Dizzy Dean 195 St. Louis Cardinals Van Mungo 184 [91]
1935 Dizzy Dean 190 St. Louis Cardinals Carl Hubbell 150 [92]
1936 Van Mungo 238 Brooklyn Dodgers Dizzy Dean 195 [93]
1937 Carl Hubbell 159 New York Giants Lee Grissom 149 [94]
1938 Clay Bryant 135 Chicago Cubs Paul Derringer 132 [95]
1939 Passeau, Claude Walters, Bucky Claude Passeau [c]
Bucky Walters [c]
137 Cincinnati Reds
Philadelphia Phillies
Chicago Cubs
Mort Cooper 130 [30]
1940 Kirby Higbe 137 Philadelphia Phillies Claude Passeau
Whit Wyatt
124 [96]
1941 Johnny Vander Meer 202 Cincinnati Reds Whit Wyatt 176 [97]
1942 Johnny Vander Meer 186 Cincinnati Reds Mort Cooper 152 [98]
1943 Johnny Vander Meer 174 Cincinnati Reds Mort Cooper 141 [99]
1944 Bill Voiselle 161 New York Giants Max Lanier 141 [100]
1945 Preacher Roe 148 Pittsburgh Pirates Hal Gregg 139 [101]
1946 Johnny Schmitz 135 Chicago Cubs Kirby Higbe 134 [102]
1947 Ewell Blackwell 193 Cincinnati Reds Ralph Branca 148 [103]
1948 Harry Brecheen 149 St. Louis Cardinals Rex Barney 138 [104]
1949 Warren Spahn 151 Boston Braves Don Newcombe 149 [105]
1950 Warren Spahn 191 Boston Braves Ewell Blackwell 188 [106]
1951 Don Newcombe
Warren Spahn
164 Brooklyn Dodgers
Boston Braves
Sal Maglie 146 [107]
1952 Warren Spahn 183 Boston Braves Bob Rush 157 [108]
1953 Robin Roberts 198 Philadelphia Phillies Carl Erskine 187 [109]
1954 Robin Roberts 185 Philadelphia Phillies Harvey Haddix 184 [110]
1955 Sam Jones 198 Chicago Cubs Robin Roberts 160 [111]
1956 Sam Jones 176 Chicago Cubs Harvey Haddix 170 [112]
1957 Jack Sanford 188 Philadelphia Phillies Moe Drabowsky
Dick Drott
170 [113]
1958 Sam Jones 225 Chicago Cubs Warren Spahn 150 [114]
1959 Don Drysdale 242 Los Angeles Dodgers Sam Jones 209 [115]
1960 Don Drysdale 246 Los Angeles Dodgers Sandy Koufax 197 [116]
1961 Sandy Koufax 269 Los Angeles Dodgers Stan Williams 205 [117]
1962 Don Drysdale 232 Los Angeles Dodgers Sandy Koufax 219 [118]
1963 Sandy Koufax 306 Los Angeles Dodgers Jim Maloney 265 [119]
1964 Bob Veale 250 Pittsburgh Pirates Bob Gibson 245 [120]
1965 Sandy Koufax 382 Los Angeles Dodgers Bob Veale 276 [121]
1966 Sandy Koufax 317 Los Angeles Dodgers Jim Bunning 252 [122]
1967 Jim Bunning 253 Philadelphia Phillies Ferguson Jenkins 236 [123]
1968 Bob Gibson 268 St. Louis Cardinals Ferguson Jenkins 260 [124]
1969 Ferguson Jenkins 273 Chicago Cubs Bob Gibson 269 [125]
1970 Tom Seaver 283 New York Mets Bob Gibson
Ferguson Jenkins
274 [126]
1971 Tom Seaver 289 New York Mets Ferguson Jenkins 263 [127]
1972 Steve Carlton 310 Philadelphia Phillies Tom Seaver 249 [128]
1973 Tom Seaver 251 New York Mets Steve Carlton 223 [129]
1974 Steve Carlton 240 Philadelphia Phillies Andy Messersmith 221 [130]
1975 Tom Seaver 243 New York Mets John Montefusco 215 [131]
1976 Tom Seaver 235 New York Mets J. R. Richard 214 [132]
1977 Phil Niekro 262 Atlanta Braves J. R. Richard 214 [133]
1978 J. R. Richard 303 Houston Astros Phil Niekro 248 [134]
1979 J. R. Richard 313 Houston Astros Steve Carlton 213 [135]
1980 Steve Carlton 286 Philadelphia Phillies Nolan Ryan 200 [136]
1981 Fernando Valenzuela 180 Los Angeles Dodgers Steve Carlton 179 [137]
1982 Steve Carlton 286 Philadelphia Phillies Mario Soto 274 [138]
1983 Steve Carlton 275 Philadelphia Phillies Mario Soto 242 [139]
1984 Dwight Gooden 276 New York Mets Fernando Valenzuela 240 [140]
1985 Dwight Gooden 268 New York Mets Mario Soto 214 [141]
1986 Mike Scott 306 Houston Astros Fernando Valenzuela 242 [142]
1987 Nolan Ryan 270 Houston Astros Mike Scott 233 [143]
1988 Nolan Ryan 228 Houston Astros David Cone 213 [144]
1989 José DeLeón 201 St. Louis Cardinals Tim Belcher 200 [145]
1990 David Cone 233 New York Mets Dwight Gooden
Ramón Martínez
223 [146]
1991 David Cone 241 New York Mets Greg Maddux † 198 [147]
1992 John Smoltz † 215 Atlanta Braves David Cone 214 [148]
1993 José Rijo 227 Cincinnati Reds John Smoltz † 208 [149]
1994 Andy Benes 189 San Diego Padres José Rijo 171 [150]
1995 Hideo Nomo 236 Los Angeles Dodgers John Smoltz † 193 [151]
1996 John Smoltz † 276 Atlanta Braves Hideo Nomo 234 [152]
1997 Curt Schilling 319 Philadelphia Phillies Pedro Martínez † 305 [153]
1998 Curt Schilling 300 Philadelphia Phillies Kevin Brown 257 [154]
1999 Randy Johnson † 364 Arizona Diamondbacks Kevin Brown 221 [28]
2000 Randy Johnson † 347 Arizona Diamondbacks Chan Ho Park 217 [155]
2001 Randy Johnson † 372 Arizona Diamondbacks Curt Schilling 293 [156]
2002 Randy Johnson † 334 Arizona Diamondbacks Curt Schilling 316 [157]
2003 Kerry Wood 266 Chicago Cubs Mark Prior 245 [158]
2004 Randy Johnson † 290 Arizona Diamondbacks Ben Sheets 264 [159]
2005 Jake Peavy 216 San Diego Padres Chris Carpenter 213 [160]
2006 Aaron Harang 216 Cincinnati Reds Jake Peavy 215 [161]
2007 Jake Peavy 240 San Diego Padres Aaron Harang 218 [162]
2008 Tim Lincecum 265 San Francisco Giants Dan Haren
Johan Santana
Edinson Vólquez
206 [163]
2009 Tim Lincecum 261 San Francisco Giants Javier Vázquez 238 [164]
2010 Tim Lincecum 231 San Francisco Giants Roy Halladay 219 [165]
2011 Clayton Kershaw 248 Los Angeles Dodgers Cliff Lee 238 [166]
2012 R.A. Dickey 230 New York Mets Clayton Kershaw 229 [167]
2013 Clayton Kershaw 232 Los Angeles Dodgers Cliff Lee 222 [168]
2014 Johnny Cueto
Stephen Strasburg
242 Cincinnati Reds
Washington Nationals
Clayton Kershaw 239 [169]
2015 Clayton Kershaw 301 Los Angeles Dodgers Max Scherzer 276 [170]
2016 Max Scherzer 284 Washington Nationals José Fernández 253 [171]
2017 Max Scherzer 268 Washington Nationals Jacob deGrom 239 [172]
2018 Max Scherzer 300 Washington Nationals Jacob deGrom 269 [173]
2019 Jacob deGrom 255 New York Mets Stephen Strasburg 251 [174]
2020 Jacob deGrom 104 New York Mets Trevor Bauer 100 [175]
Year Leader K Team Runner-up K Ref
1901 Cy Young 158 Boston Americans Roy Patterson 127 [179]
1902 Rube Waddell 210 Philadelphia Athletics Cy Young 160 [180]
1903 Rube Waddell 302 Philadelphia Athletics Bill Donovan 187 [181]
1904 Rube Waddell 349 Philadelphia Athletics Jack Chesbro 239 [182]
1905 Rube Waddell 287 Philadelphia Athletics Eddie Plank
Cy Young
210 [183]
1906 Rube Waddell 196 Philadelphia Athletics Cy Falkenberg 178 [184]
1907 Rube Waddell 232 Philadelphia Athletics Ed Walsh 206 [185]
1908 Ed Walsh 269 Chicago White Sox Rube Waddell 232 [186]
1909 Frank Smith 177 Chicago White Sox Walter Johnson 164 [187]
1910 Walter Johnson 313 Washington Senators Ed Walsh 258 [188]
1911 Ed Walsh 255 Chicago White Sox Joe Wood 231 [189]
1912 Walter Johnson 303 Washington Senators Joe Wood 258 [190]
1913 Walter Johnson 243 Washington Senators Cy Falkenberg
Vean Gregg
166 [191]
1914 Walter Johnson 225 Washington Senators Willie Mitchell 179 [192]
1915 Walter Johnson 203 Washington Senators Red Faber 182 [193]
1916 Walter Johnson 228 Washington Senators Elmer Myers 182 [194]
1917 Walter Johnson 188 Washington Senators Eddie Cicotte 150 [195]
1918 Walter Johnson 162 Washington Senators Jim Shaw 129 [196]
1919 Walter Johnson 147 Washington Senators Jim Shaw 128 [197]
1920 Stan Coveleski 133 Cleveland Indians Lefty Williams 128 [198]
1921 Walter Johnson 143 Washington Senators Urban Shocker 132 [199]
1922 Urban Shocker 149 St. Louis Browns Red Faber 148 [200]
1923 Walter Johnson 130 Washington Senators Joe Bush
Bob Shawkey
125 [201]
1924 Walter Johnson 158 Washington Senators Howard Ehmke 119 [202]
1925 Lefty Grove 116 Philadelphia Athletics Walter Johnson 108 [203]
1926 Lefty Grove 194 Philadelphia Athletics George Uhle 159 [204]
1927 Lefty Grove 174 Philadelphia Athletics Rube Walberg 136 [205]
1928 Lefty Grove 183 Philadelphia Athletics George Pipgras 139 [206]
1929 Lefty Grove 170 Philadelphia Athletics George Earnshaw 149 [207]
1930 Lefty Grove 209 Philadelphia Athletics George Earnshaw 193 [208]
1931 Lefty Grove 175 Philadelphia Athletics George Earnshaw 152 [209]
1932 Red Ruffing 190 New York Yankees Lefty Grove 188 [210]
1933 Lefty Gomez 163 New York Yankees Bump Hadley 149 [211]
1934 Lefty Gomez 158 New York Yankees Tommy Bridges 151 [212]
1935 Tommy Bridges 163 Detroit Tigers Schoolboy Rowe 140 [213]
1936 Tommy Bridges 175 Detroit Tigers Johnny Allen 165 [214]
1937 Lefty Gomez 194 New York Yankees Bobo Newsom 166 [215]
1938 Bob Feller 240 Cleveland Indians Bobo Newsom 226 [216]
1939 Bob Feller 246 Cleveland Indians Bobo Newsom 192 [217]
1940 Bob Feller 261 Cleveland Indians Bobo Newsom 164 [218]
1941 Bob Feller 260 Cleveland Indians Bobo Newsom 175 [219]
1942 Tex Hughson
Bobo Newsom
113 Boston Red Sox
Washington Senators
Al Benton
Phil Marchildon
110 [31]
1943 Allie Reynolds 151 Cleveland Indians Hal Newhouser 144 [220]
1944 Hal Newhouser 187 Detroit Tigers Dizzy Trout 144 [221]
1945 Hal Newhouser 212 Detroit Tigers Nels Potter 129 [222]
1946 Bob Feller 348 Cleveland Indians Hal Newhouser 275 [223]
1947 Bob Feller 196 Cleveland Indians Hal Newhouser 176 [224]
1948 Bob Feller 164 Cleveland Indians Bob Lemon 147 [225]
1949 Virgil Trucks 153 Detroit Tigers Hal Newhouser 144 [226]
1950 Bob Lemon 170 Cleveland Indians Allie Reynolds 160 [227]
1951 Vic Raschi 164 New York Yankees Early Wynn 133 [228]
1952 Allie Reynolds 160 New York Yankees Early Wynn 153 [229]
1953 Billy Pierce 186 Chicago White Sox Virgil Trucks 149 [230]
1954 Bob Turley 185 Baltimore Orioles Early Wynn 155 [231]
1955 Herb Score 245 Cleveland Indians Bob Turley 210 [232]
1956 Herb Score 263 Cleveland Indians Billy Pierce 192 [233]
1957 Early Wynn 184 Cleveland Indians Jim Bunning 182 [234]
1958 Early Wynn 179 Chicago White Sox Jim Bunning 177 [235]
1959 Jim Bunning 201 Detroit Tigers Camilo Pascual 185 [236]
1960 Jim Bunning 201 Detroit Tigers Pedro Ramos 160 [237]
1961 Camilo Pascual 221 Minnesota Twins Whitey Ford 209 [238]
1962 Camilo Pascual 206 Minnesota Twins Jim Bunning 184 [239]
1963 Camilo Pascual 202 Minnesota Twins Jim Bunning 196 [240]
1964 Al Downing 217 New York Yankees Camilo Pascual 213 [241]
1965 Sam McDowell 325 Cleveland Indians Mickey Lolich 226 [242]
1966 Sam McDowell 225 Cleveland Indians Jim Kaat 205 [243]
1967 Jim Lonborg 246 Boston Red Sox Sam McDowell 236 [244]
1968 Sam McDowell 283 Cleveland Indians Denny McLain 280 [245]
1969 Sam McDowell 279 Cleveland Indians Mickey Lolich 271 [246]
1970 Sam McDowell 304 Cleveland Indians Mickey Lolich 230 [247]
1971 Mickey Lolich 308 Detroit Tigers Vida Blue 301 [248]
1972 Nolan Ryan 329 California Angels Mickey Lolich 250 [249]
1973 Nolan Ryan 383 California Angels Bert Blyleven 258 [29]
1974 Nolan Ryan 367 California Angels Bert Blyleven 249 [250]
1975 Frank Tanana 269 California Angels Bert Blyleven
Gaylord Perry
233 [251]
1976 Nolan Ryan 327 California Angels Frank Tanana 261 [252]
1977 Nolan Ryan 341 California Angels Dennis Leonard 244 [253]
1978 Nolan Ryan 260 California Angels Ron Guidry 248 [254]
1979 Nolan Ryan 223 California Angels Ron Guidry 201 [255]
1980 Len Barker 187 Cleveland Indians Mike Norris 180 [256]
1981 Len Barker 127 Cleveland Indians Britt Burns 108 [257]
1982 Floyd Bannister 209 Seattle Mariners Len Barker 187 [258]
1983 Jack Morris 232 Detroit Tigers Floyd Bannister 193 [259]
1984 Mark Langston 204 Seattle Mariners Dave Stieb 198 [260]
1985 Bert Blyleven 206 Cleveland Indians
Minnesota Twins
Floyd Bannister 198 [261]
1986 Mark Langston 245 Seattle Mariners Roger Clemens 238 [262]
1987 Mark Langston 262 Seattle Mariners Roger Clemens 256 [263]
1988 Roger Clemens 291 Boston Red Sox Mark Langston 235 [264]
1989 Nolan Ryan 301 Texas Rangers Roger Clemens 230 [265]
1990 Nolan Ryan 232 Texas Rangers Bobby Witt 221 [266]
1991 Roger Clemens 241 Boston Red Sox Randy Johnson † 228 [267]
1992 Randy Johnson † 241 Seattle Mariners Mélido Pérez 218 [268]
1993 Randy Johnson † 308 Seattle Mariners Mark Langston 196 [269]
1994 Randy Johnson † 204 Seattle Mariners Roger Clemens 168 [270]
1995 Randy Johnson † 294 Seattle Mariners Todd Stottlemyre 205 [271]
1996 Roger Clemens 257 Boston Red Sox Chuck Finley 215 [272]
1997 Roger Clemens 292 Toronto Blue Jays Randy Johnson † 291 [273]
1998 Roger Clemens 271 Toronto Blue Jays Pedro Martínez † 251 [274]
1999 Pedro Martínez † 313 Boston Red Sox Chuck Finley 200 [275]
2000 Pedro Martínez † 284 Boston Red Sox Bartolo Colón 212 [276]
2001 Hideo Nomo 220 Boston Red Sox Mike Mussina 214 [277]
2002 Pedro Martínez † 239 Boston Red Sox Roger Clemens 192 [278]
2003 Esteban Loaiza 207 Chicago White Sox Pedro Martínez † 206 [279]
2004 Johan Santana 265 Minnesota Twins Pedro Martínez † 227 [280]
2005 Johan Santana 238 Minnesota Twins Randy Johnson † 211 [281]
2006 Johan Santana 245 Minnesota Twins Jeremy Bonderman 202 [177]
2007 Scott Kazmir 239 Tampa Bay Devil Rays Johan Santana 235 [282]
2008 A. J. Burnett 231 Toronto Blue Jays Ervin Santana 214 [283]
2009 Justin Verlander 269 Detroit Tigers Zack Greinke 242 [284]
2010 Jered Weaver 233 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Félix Hernández 232 [285]
2011 Justin Verlander 250 Detroit Tigers CC Sabathia 230 [286]
2012 Justin Verlander 239 Detroit Tigers Max Scherzer 231 [287]
2013 Yu Darvish 277 Texas Rangers Max Scherzer 240 [288]
2014 David Price 271 Tampa Bay Rays
Detroit Tigers
Corey Kluber 269 [289]
2015 Chris Sale 274 Chicago White Sox Chris Archer 252 [290]
2016 Justin Verlander 254 Detroit Tigers Chris Archer
Chris Sale
233 [291]
2017 Chris Sale 308 Boston Red Sox Corey Kluber 265 [292]
2018 Justin Verlander 290 Houston Astros Gerrit Cole 276 [293]
2019 Gerrit Cole 326 Houston Astros Justin Verlander 300 [294]
2020 Shane Bieber 122 Cleveland Indians Lucas Giolito 97 [295]
Year Leader K Team League Runner-up K Ref
1882 Tony Mullane 170 Louisville Eclipse American Association Harry Salisbury 135 [296]
1883 Tim Keefe 359 New York Metropolitans American Association Bobby Mathews 203 [27]
1884 Guy Hecker 385 Louisville Eclipse American Association Hardie Henderson 346 [297]
1884 Hugh Daily 483 Chicago Browns
Washington Nationals
Union Association Bill Sweeney 374 [298]
1885 Ed Morris 298 Pittsburgh Alleghenys American Association Bobby Mathews 286 [299]
1886 Matt Kilroy 513 Baltimore Orioles American Association Toad Ramsey 499 [300]
1887 Toad Ramsey 355 Louisville Eclipse American Association Matt Kilroy 217 [301]
1888 Ed Seward 272 Philadelphia Athletics American Association Silver King 258 [302]
1889 Mark Baldwin 368 Columbus Solons American Association Matt Kilroy 217 [303]
1890 Sadie McMahon 291 Philadelphia Athletics
Baltimore Orioles
American Association Jack Stivetts 289 [304]
1890 Mark Baldwin 206 Chicago Pirates Players' League Silver King 185 [305]
1891 Jack Stivetts 259 St. Louis Browns American Association Phil Knell 228 [306]
1914 Cy Falkenberg 236 Indianapolis Hoosiers Federal League Earl Moseley 205 [307]
1915 Dave Davenport 229 St. Louis Terriers Federal League Al Schulz 160 [308]
  • a Recognized "major leagues" include the current American and National Leagues and several defunct leagues—the American Association, the Federal League, the Players' League, and the Union Association. [309]
  • b In baseball scorekeeping, "K" is the traditional notation for the strikeout. [310]
  • c In 1939, Claude Passeau played the entire season for the Cincinnati Reds, while co-leader Bucky Walters was traded from the Philadelphia Phillies to the Chicago Cubs mid-season.
  • "Hall of Fame Pitching Register". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved February 9, 2010 .
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380 ms 17.6% Scribunto_LuaSandboxCallback::getExpandedArgument 220 ms 10.2% Scribunto_LuaSandboxCallback::callParserFunction 180 ms 8.3% Scribunto_LuaSandboxCallback::plain 160 ms 7.4% 140 ms 6.5% (for generator) 140 ms 6.5% ? 140 ms 6.5% Scribunto_LuaSandboxCallback::find 140 ms 6.5% type 120 ms 5.6% Scribunto_LuaSandboxCallback::gsub 120 ms 5.6% [others] 420 ms 19.4% Number of Wikibase entities loaded: 0/400 -->


HJKC Staff

By Leo Schlink, for the HKJC.

Tony Cruz is optimistic Hong Kong’s reigning Horse of the Year Exultant can join a select band of multiple winners of the G1 Standard Chartered Champions & Chater Cup (2400m) when his stable flagbearer returns to Sha Tin on Sunday (23 May).

Already the most successful trainer in the modern history of the race, Cruz will unleash three runners at the Cup on the weekend as Exultant bids to match the 2006-07 and 2009 feats of Viva Pataca, the last galloper to land the staying contest at least three times.

Super Win (1975, 1976 and 1977) and Silver Lining (1978, 1979 and 1981) were similarly dominant but River Verdon, who prevailed four times from 1991-94, stands alone as the most successful competitor in the final G1 of the season.

In a reign interrupted only by John Moore’s Werther in 2017, Cruz has ruled the mile and a half feature with seven of the eight most recent winners – California Memory (2013), Blazing Speed (2014 and 2016), Helene Super Star (2015), Pakistan Star (2018) and Exultant (2019 and 2020).

Adding further lustre to an extraordinary record in the race, Cruz partnered Makarpura Star in a deadheat decision in 1995, when Moore provided a remarkable quinella with Survey King (Greg Childs).

Cruz believes Exultant can provide his eighth triumph in the race as a trainer, as Zac Purton bids for a third straight win on the tough Irish-bred stayer.

“I believe so (that Exultant can win), there’s no foreign horses around this year, that’s a big help,” said Cruz, who will also saddle Time Warp and Packing Waltham.

“I brought him (Exultant) to Conghua, so he’s really nice and fresh again. His trial (a 1200m win on 13 May) was very good in Conghua. He seems to be all set.

“He’s getting on bit in age and he seems to be slipping a bit. Zac came back after his last run (fifth to Loves Only You in the G1 FWD QEII Cup on April 25) and said he doesn’t seem to have that fight like he used to have – (when) he wouldn’t let another horse past him.

“So, I decided to send him to Conghua to freshen up. He can’t be tired. He’s fresh and ready for this race. I’ve freshened him up. I think he’s 100 percent for this race, really.”

With four seconds, a third and fifth this season, Exultant is clearly performing below the form which enabled the son of Teofilo to snare five G1s across the two previous seasons.

But with the absence of Golden Sixty, Cruz is hopeful the seven-year-old can return to the winners’ circle on Sunday.

“Obviously he (Golden Sixty) would have been the main opposition, so I’m glad he (Francis Lui) made the decision not to run,” Cruz said before expanding on the qualities which made Exultant such a formidable opponent.

“He’s really a stayer, he’s got the one speed but he’s got a good heart. He won’t let another horse pass him – that’s really the ability that he’s got. He’s a top category horse, a Group One horse, that’s the kind of ability he’s got.

“He’s got speed and long distance. He hasn’t got early speed, but he’s got stamina. He could run a two-mile race.

“The highlight is that he’s never disappointed us, only this season he did, but I’m sure he’s fresh again so I’ll be very happy to see him in the winners’ enclosure again, hopefully.

“As a mile and a half horse, he’s the best one (I’ve had).”

Apart from his stablemates, Exultant’s opposition on Sunday will include Glorious Dragon, Butterfield, Panfield, Columbus County and Russian Emperor.


Explore nature trails winding along the Mississippi River and through woodlands and restored prairie.

Oliver Kelley Farm

15788 Kelley Farm Rd.
Elk River, MN 55330
[email protected]
763-441-6896
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Funding provided by the State of Minnesota, the Legacy Amendment through the vote of Minnesotans on Nov. 4, 2008, and our generous donors and members.


Testosterone Replacement for Male Hypogonadism

FDA-INDICATED USES

As part of its 2015 advisory on cardiovascular risk, the FDA also issued a statement clarifying that testosterone therapy is approved specifically for men with low testosterone levels caused by disorders of the testicles, pituitary gland, or brain that cause hypogonadism (i.e., genetic disorders, damage from chemotherapy or infection, or pituitary tumors) and not for men with age-related low testosterone.38 Physicians should be aware that prescribing testosterone for low testosterone levels due to aging constitutes off-label use.

FORMULATIONS AND PRECAUTIONS

Many testosterone formulations are available (Table 4 59 , 60 ) , and no formulation has superior clinical effects. The selection of formulation requires discussion about administration route, adverse effects, and cost. Testosterone preparations are FDA Schedule III controlled substances that are subject to diversion and misuse. Completion of a controlled substance contract should be considered before prescribing.

Preparations of Testosterone

Buccal testosterone (Striant)

May alter taste or irritate oral mucosa

Testosterone cypionate (Depo-Testosterone)

50 to 400 mg every one to four weeks

100 mg weekly or 200 mg every two weeks

200 mg per mL: $115 ($130) for one 10-mL vial

Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl)

50 to 400 mg every one to four weeks

100 mg weekly or 200 mg every two weeks

200 mg per mL: $80 ($100) for one 5-mL vial

Serum levels tend to have peaks and troughs

Testosterone undecanoate (Aveed)

750-mg initial dose and another 750 mg four weeks later, then 750 mg every 10 weeks

Two doses four weeks apart, then every 10 weeks

Special prescriber registration required because of risk of anaphylaxis and pulmonary oil microembolism

33 mg one actuation (11 mg) in each nostril three times daily

Adverse effects include headache, nasopharyngeal and upper respiratory symptoms

150 to 450 mg every three to six months

150 mg every three months

NA ($950) for 10 75-mg pellets

1% gel: $310 ($560) for 30 50-mg doses

Possible to transfer from one person to another risk of virilization of exposed women and children

$400 ($600) for 30 50-mg doses

Transdermal patch (Androderm)

NA ($550) for 30 4-mg patches

Skin rash common patients should be advised to rotate application sites

Transdermal solution (Axiron)

30 mg: NA ($615) for one bottle

Applied to axillary area similar to deodorant risk of transfer to others as with gel forms

*— Estimated retail price based on information obtained at http://www.goodrx.com (accessed March 29, 2017). Generic listed first, brand in parentheses.

Information from references 59 and 60 .

Preparations of Testosterone

Buccal testosterone (Striant)

May alter taste or irritate oral mucosa

Testosterone cypionate (Depo-Testosterone)

50 to 400 mg every one to four weeks

100 mg weekly or 200 mg every two weeks

200 mg per mL: $115 ($130) for one 10-mL vial

Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl)

50 to 400 mg every one to four weeks

100 mg weekly or 200 mg every two weeks

200 mg per mL: $80 ($100) for one 5-mL vial

Serum levels tend to have peaks and troughs

Testosterone undecanoate (Aveed)

750-mg initial dose and another 750 mg four weeks later, then 750 mg every 10 weeks

Two doses four weeks apart, then every 10 weeks

Special prescriber registration required because of risk of anaphylaxis and pulmonary oil microembolism

33 mg one actuation (11 mg) in each nostril three times daily

Adverse effects include headache, nasopharyngeal and upper respiratory symptoms

150 to 450 mg every three to six months

150 mg every three months

NA ($950) for 10 75-mg pellets

1% gel: $310 ($560) for 30 50-mg doses

Possible to transfer from one person to another risk of virilization of exposed women and children

$400 ($600) for 30 50-mg doses

Transdermal patch (Androderm)

NA ($550) for 30 4-mg patches

Skin rash common patients should be advised to rotate application sites

Transdermal solution (Axiron)

30 mg: NA ($615) for one bottle

Applied to axillary area similar to deodorant risk of transfer to others as with gel forms

*— Estimated retail price based on information obtained at http://www.goodrx.com (accessed March 29, 2017). Generic listed first, brand in parentheses.

Information from references 59 and 60 .


The Mysterious Disappearance of Flight 19

It began as nothing more than a routine training flight. At 2:10 p.m. on December 5, 1945, five TBM Avenger torpedo bombers took off from a Naval Air Station in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. The planes𠅌ollectively known as 𠇏light 19”—were scheduled to tackle a three-hour exercise known as “Navigation Problem Number One.” Their triangular flight plan called for them to head east from the Florida coast and conduct bombing runs at a place called Hens and Chickens Shoals. They would then turn north and proceed over Grand Bahama Island before changing course a third time and flying southwest back to base. Save for one plane that only carried two men, each of the Avengers was crewed by three Navy men or Marines, most of whom had logged around 300 hours in the air. The flight’s leader was Lieutenant Charles C. Taylor, an experienced pilot and veteran of several combat missions in World War II’s Pacific Theater.

At first, Flight 19’s hop proceeded just as smoothly as the previous 18 that day. Taylor and his pilots buzzed over Hens and Chickens Shoals around 2:30 p.m. and dropped their practice bombs without incident. But shortly after the patrol turned north for the second leg of its journey, something very strange happened. For reasons that are still unclear, Taylor became convinced that his Avenger’s compass was malfunctioning and that his planes had been flying in the wrong direction. The troubles only mounted after a front blew in and brought rain, gusting winds and heavy cloud cover. Flight 19 became hopelessly disoriented. “I don’t know where we are,” one of the pilots said over the radio. “We must have got lost after that last turn.”

Overal aerial view of Fort Lauderdale Naval Air Station the origin of 𠇏light 19.” (Credit: Acey Harper/Getty Images)

Lieutenant Robert F. Cox, another Navy flight instructor who was flying near the Florida coast, was the first to overhear the patrol’s radio communications. He immediately informed the Air Station of the situation and then contacted the Avengers to ask if they needed assistance. 𠇋oth my compasses are out and I’m trying to find Ft. Lauderdale, Florida,” Taylor said, his voice sounding anxious. “I’m over land, but it’s broken. I’m sure I’m in the Keys, but I don’t know how far down.”

Taylor’s claim didn’t seem to make sense. He𠆝 made his scheduled pass over Hens and Chicken Shoals in the Bahamas less than an hour earlier, but he now believed his planes had somehow drifted hundreds of miles off course and ended up in the Florida Keys. The 27-year-old had just transferred to Fort Lauderdale from Miami, and many have since speculated that he may have confused some of the islands of the Bahamas for the Keys. Under normal circumstances, pilots lost in the Atlantic were supposed to point their planes toward the setting sun and fly west toward the mainland, but Taylor had become convinced that he might be over the Gulf of Mexico. Hoping to locate the Florida peninsula, he made a fateful decision to steer Flight 19 northeast𠅊 course that would only take them even farther out to sea. Some of his pilots seemed to have recognized that he was making a mistake. �mmit,” one man griped over the radio. “If we would just fly west, we would get home.”

Taylor was eventually persuaded to turn around and head west, but shortly after 6 p.m., he seems to have cancelled the order and once again changed direction. “We didn’t go far enough east,” he said, still worried that he might be in the Gulf. “We may as well just turn around and go east again.” His pilots probably argued against the decision—some investigators even believe that one plane broke off and flew in a different direction𠅋ut most followed their commander’s lead. Flight 19’s radio transmissions soon became increasingly faint as it meandered out to sea. When fuel began to run low, Taylor was heard prepping his men for a potential crash landing in the ocean. 𠇊ll planes close up tight,” he said. “We’ll have to ditch unless landfall…when the first plane drops below ten gallons, we all go down together.” A few minutes later, the Avengers’ last radio communications were replaced by an eerie buzz of static.

A Martin PBM Mariner suspended from a ship’s stern crane. (Credit: PhotoQuest/Getty Images)

The Navy immediately scrambled search planes to hunt for the missing patrol. Around 7:30 p.m., a pair of PBM Mariner flying boats took off from an air station north of Ft. Lauderdale. Just 20 minutes later, however, one of them seemed to follow Flight 19’s lead by suddenly vanishing off radar. The remains of the Mariner and its 13 crewmen were never recovered, but it’s commonly believed that the seaplane exploded shortly after takeoff. Flying boats were notoriously accident-prone, and were even nicknamed 𠇏lying gas tanks” for their propensity for catching fire. Suspicions that the seaplane may have gone up in flames were all but confirmed by a passing merchant ship, which spotted a fireball and found evidence of an oil slick in the ocean.

At first light the next day, the Navy dispatched more than 300 boats and aircraft to look for Flight 19 and the missing Mariner. The search party spent five days combing through more than 300,000 square miles of territory, to no avail. “They just vanished,” Navy Lieutenant David White later recalled. “We had hundreds of planes out looking, and we searched over land and water for days, and nobody ever found the bodies or any debris.” A Navy board of investigation was also left scratching its head. While it argued that Taylor might have confused the Bahamas for the Florida Keys after his compasses malfunctioned, it could find no clear explanation for why Flight 19 had become so disoriented. Its members eventually attributed the loss to �uses or reasons unknown.”

The strange events of December 5, 1945 have since become fodder for all manner of wild theories and speculation. In the 1960s and 70s, pulp magazines and writers such as Vincent Gaddis and Charles Berlitz helped popularize the idea that Flight 19 had been gobbled up by the �rmuda Triangle,” a section of the Atlantic supposedly known for its high volume of freak disappearances and mechanical failures. Other books and fictional portrayals have suggested that magnetic anomalies, parallel dimensions and alien abductions might have all played a role in the tragedy. In 1977, the film 𠇌lose Encounters of the Third Kind” famously depicted Flight 19 as having been whisked away by flying saucers and later deposited in the deserts of Mexico.

Even if the “Lost Patrol” didn’t fall victim to the supernatural, there’s no denying that its disappearance was accompanied by many oddities and unanswered questions. Perhaps the strangest of all concerns Lieutenant Taylor. Witnesses later claimed that he arrived to Flight 19’s pre-exercise briefing several minutes late and requested to be excused from leading the mission. “I just don’t want to take this one out,” he supposedly said. Just why Taylor tried to get out of flying remains a mystery, but it has led many to suggest that he may have not been fit for duty. Also unexplained is why none of the members of Flight 19 made use of the rescue radio frequency or their planes’ ZBX receivers, which could have helped lead them toward Navy radio towers on land. The pilots were told to switch the devices on, but they either didn’t hear the message or didn’t acknowledge it.

What really happened to Flight 19? The most likely scenario is that the planes eventually ran out of gas and ditched in the ocean somewhere off the coast of Florida, leaving any survivors at the mercy of rough seas and deep water. In 1991, a group of treasure hunters seemed to have finally solved the puzzle when they stumbled upon the watery graves of five World War II-era Avengers near Fort Lauderdale. Unfortunately, it was later found that the hulks belonged to a different group of Navy planes whose serial numbers didn’t match those of the fabled “Lost Patrol.” Many believe the wrecks of Flight 19 and its doomed rescue plane may still lurk somewhere in the Bermuda Triangle, but while the search continues to this day, no definitive signs of the six aircraft or their 27 crewmen have ever been found.


6th Infantry Regiment

Mustered in: May 25, 1861
Mustered out: June 25, 1863

The following is taken from New York in the War of the Rebellion, 3rd ed. Frederick Phisterer. Albany: J. B. Lyon Company, 1912.
This regiment was recruited in New York city, organized under Col. William Wilson on Staten Island, and accepted by the State May 22, 1861. It was mustered in the service of the United States for two years, Companies A, B, C, D and E April 30, and F, G, H, I and K May 25, 1861. A number of the members of Company B, Empire City Guard, an incomplete organization, joined Company D of this regiment.
The regiment left the State June 15, 1861 served at Santa Rosa Island, Fla., Department of Florida, from June 23, 1861 three companies at Fort Jefferson, Fla., from January, 1862 in Department of the South, from March, 1862 in the West District of the Department of the South, from April, 1862 at Pensacola, Fla., from May 9, 1862 in the Department of the Gulf, from November, 1862 in the First Brigade (Dwight's), Grover's Division, Department of the Gulf, from December 30, 1862 in the 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 19th Corps, from March, 1863 on the expiration of its term of service it was returned to New York city, and there, under Colonel Wilson, honorably discharged and mustered out June 25, 1863.
During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 12 enlisted men of wounds received in action, 3 enlisted men of disease and other causes, 34 enlisted men total, 49.

The following is taken from The Union army: a history of military affairs in the loyal states, 1861-65 -- records of the regiments in the Union army -- cyclopedia of battles -- memoirs of commanders and soldiers. Madison, WI: Federal Pub. Co., 1908.
Sixth Infantry.&mdashCol., William Wilson Lieut.-Cols., John Creighton, Michael Cassidy Majs., William Newby, James W. Burgess. The 6th, recruited in New York city and known as Wilson's Zouaves, was mustered into the U. S. service at Tompkinsville, April 30 and May 25, 1861, for two years. It left New York city on June 15 on the steamer Vanderbilt for Santa Rosa island, Fla., where it encamped near Fort Pickens. Cos. A, B and C were stationed at Key West and Tortugas, and Cos. G and I at batteries Lincoln and Cameron. The companies remaining at the original camp were attacked in October and fell back to battery Totten. In Nov., 1861, and Jan., 1862, the fortifications of Pensacola were bombarded, the regiment taking part in the attack, and upon the evacuation of the city in May the 6th was quartered in the town, Cos. G and I being stationed at Fort Barrancas. It was ordered to New Orleans in Nov., 1862, where it was attached to Sherman's division and later to Grover's division, with which it moved to Baton Rouge. In March, 1863, the 4th division (Grover's), of the 19th corps was ordered to Brashear City and took part in an expedition to Irish bend, where an engagement ensued in which the 6th was active, as also at Vermillion bayou. Upon returning it was ordered to Alexandria and there embarked for New York city, where it was mustered out on June 25, 1863. The original members numbered 770, of whom 14 were killed or died of wounds, and 32 died from other causes.

6th Regiment NY Volunteer Infantry | General Guide Flag | Civil War

Presented to the 6th Regiment NY Volunteer Infantry by Thomas C. Burns on behalf of the citizens of Staten Island, New York, this white silk guide…


The First Fan

While both President Calvin Coolidge and First Lady Grace Coolidge were well known baseball supporters, not everyone realized that of the two, Grace Coolidge was by far the more knowledgeable and enthusiastic fan.

Bucky Harris, who managed the Senators during their great run of 1920s success, said she was “the most rabid baseball fan I ever knew in the White House.” 1 (When Harris was married in October 1926, both the president and first lady attended the wedding.) 2

Grace Coolidge attended as many games as she could, faithfully keeping track of the proceedings on her scorecard. To stay in close touch with her team while sailing down the Potomac on the presidential yacht Mayflower, she listened to Senators games on radio station WRC. 3

President Calvin Coolidge and First Lady Grace Coolidge at a baseball game with Coolidge’s secretary C. Bascom Slemp at right, 1924.

The Senators clinched their first American League championship on September 29, 1924. Many D.C.-area fans were delighted that pitching great Walter Johnson – “bigger than the Washington Monument, broader than the Potomac River” – would have the first chance in his 18-year career to play in a World Series. (The Coolidges joined other fans in contributing $8,000 to buy Johnson a Lincoln limousine as a gift of appreciation.) With ticket dealers active on Pennsylvania Avenue’s “Scalpers Row” near the White House, city-wide excitement reached a fever pitch. 4

On October 4, the Coolidges joined 35,760 fans for game one of the series. The score was tied 2-2 in the ninth inning when President Coolidge resolved that it was time to return to the White House. When he rose to leave, the first lady, resplendent in her “good luck” necklace of seven ivory elephants, snapped, “Where do you think you’re going? You sit down,” seizing his coattails to emphasize her point. Coolidge obeyed and stayed on to see the Giants win in extra innings. 5

When Senators’ catcher Muddy Ruel crossed home plate with the winning run of the seventh and deciding game at 5:04 on the afternoon of October 10, Washington exploded with joy – “Armistice Day and Mardi Gras blended into one,” reported the New York Times. Exultant fans half-carried Walter Johnson to President Coolidge, who told him, “Nice work. I am glad you won.”

The first lady’s response was cheerier. “She jumped up and down with both feet,” said The Sporting News, “waved her arms, yelled, called out to Walter Johnson … The picture of sedateness on her arrival, she left as rumpled, as tired, and as happy as the thousands of other fans.” 6

President Calvin Coolidge signs a baseball for Hall of Fame pitcher Walter Johnson as Johnson’s Senators teammates look on, 1924.

Both Coolidges were present at the Senators’ home opener on April 22, 1925, participating in what Francis P. Daily of the Washington Post called the “first collective siege of baseball heebee jeebies in the history of the nation’s seat of government.” The Senators reached the World Series again that season, but the result was a disappointment they lost in seven games to the Pittsburgh Pirates (They would make only one more world series appearance – in 1933 – before leaving Washington for good in 1971.) The Coolidges attended game three in Washington, a 4-3 Senators victory, but had to listen gloomily on a radio in the White House as the Senators lost the deciding game in Pittsburgh. 7

President Coolidge prepares to throw out the first ball of game three of the 1925 World Series Pittsburgh Pirates manager Bill McKechnie stands to the president’s right and Washington Senators manager Bucky Harris stands on Coolidge’s left baseball commissioner Kennesaw Mountain Landis is visible at Harris’ left shoulder, October 10, 1925.

After the Coolidges returned to their hometown of Northampton, Massachusetts in 1929, they transferred their allegiance from the Senators to the Boston Red Sox. Following her husband’s death in 1933, Grace Coolidge traveled the 100 miles from Northampton to Boston several times a year to watch the Red Sox play.

“It’s a lot of fun …,” she said. “I’m an American League fan and have been ever since we were in Washington and the Washington Senators won the pennant and the World Series.” She attended game three of the 1946 Red Sox-Cardinals World Series seated in a box along the first base line however, photographers were far more interested in getting snapshots of the lady sitting behind her, movie star Rita Hayworth. 8

“As soon as I venture an opinion on baseball or about a team,” she observed in 1949, “I get hundreds of letters from fans who agree or disagree with me. It’s really an awful burden. I don’t have a secretary and I have to answer the letters myself. … I’m over 70 now. I feel I’ve done my part. I just want to enjoy a baseball game now and then without attracting a lot of attention.” 9

From left to right: Treasury Secretary Andrew W. Mellon, First Lady Grace Coolidge, President Calvin Coolidge, Secretary of State Frank B. Kellogg and Attorney General John G. Sargent on Senators’ home opening day, April 22, 1925.

At a father-son baseball dinner at Northampton in November 1948, the featured speaker, Philadelphia Athletics pitcher Joe Coleman, was asked if an unassisted triple play had ever taken place during a World Series. Flustered, Coleman admitted he didn’t know the answer. At that moment a voice spoke up from the audience:

“Yes, Bill Wambsganss, Cleveland infield, in the 1920 series.” The voice belonged to Grace Coolidge, and she was exactly right. 10


Watch the video: Exultant (June 2022).


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