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Joseph Cudahy Str - History

Joseph Cudahy Str - History


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Joseph Cudahy

Former name retained.

(Str: dp. 7,045; 1. 293'; b. 47'2"; dr. 22'11"; s. 10.5 k.; cpl. 61; a. 2 3")

Joseph Cudahy, a tanker, was launched 1917 by Baltimore Drydock & Shipbuilding Co., Baltimore, Md., for Sinclair Gulf Corp.; chartered by the Army Transport Service, she carried general cargo between New York and European posts during 1917-18. In mid-August 1918, she was steaming from France to New York to be commissioned in the Navy for service with NOTS when she was torpedoed by German submarine U-90 some 700 miles from the English coast. Before Joseph Cudahy went under at 1830 on 17 August 1918 all but one of the crew managed to find safety on lifeboats.


Joseph Cudahy Str - History

Cudahy Lions Club History

The Cudahy Lions Club was organized with 21 charter members and sponsored as a club, with Lions International, by the South Milwaukee Lions Club. The Charter was presented to the Club on May 10, 1950 by Lions District Governor A.M. Bearder at St. Joseph&rsquos Church Hall in Cudahy.

In November, 1950, Lion President Larry Kelly started the Club&rsquos first project, &ldquoThe Cudahy Community Blood Bank.&rdquo The Club continues to operate these blood banks, now held at the Cudahy Family Library. Since its inception, the Club&rsquos Blood Banks have had over 7,000 pints of blood donated.

In 1953, the Club took on another project, raising money to help build a community hospital. Club members went door to door soliciting donations for the construction of what became known as Trinity Memorial Hospital. In addition, the Club also donated another $10,000 toward this community project.

In 1956, the Club made its first, of what is now an annual donation to Leader Dogs. Leader Dogs trains service dogs for those in need. That same year, the Club began its scholarship program. The first recipient received a $200 scholarship. This scholarship program continues to this day and we presently prove up to 6 scholarships to Cudahy High School seniors totaling up to $8,750. In 2015, the Club surpassed $250,000 in awarded scholarships.

The Club has sponsored 2 other area Clubs who had applied for a Charter, Greendale in 1956 and St. Francis in 1970.

The Club supports many programs/projects both locally and internationally. Here is a listing of some of the programs/projects the Club has supported and continues to support:

Project Concern of Cudahy & St. Francis (local food pantry)

Interfaith of Cudahy & St. Francis

Cudahy Family Library (construction and ongoing events)

Cudahy Fire Department for needed equipment

Cudahy Police Department for needed equipment

Cudahy Health Department for purchase of child safety seats and cribs for kids for low income families

Cudahy Historical Society

Sponsored Boy Scout Troop

Sponsoring Cudahy residents to attend Wisconsin Lion Camp (summer camp for diabetic children and their families)

Cudahy School District for academic and sports programs

Covering the cost of vision exams and glasses for low income residents of Cudahy

Maintained funding to help pay for diabetes medications for uninsured individuals seen at a Free Clinic

The Club holds fundraisers throughout the year to help fund all of these programs/projects. All funds raised go back into our community. Our biggest fundraiser is our Sweet Apple-Wood Festival. The festival runs for 3 days and is held in Cudahy Park on Ramsey Avenue in Cudahy. The Club also operates a food and beverage booth during the City&rsquos 4 th of July festivities in Sheridan Park on S. Lake Drive.

In 2011, the Club began performing vision screening of elementary school children in Cudahy. Ten members of the Club have received certification as vision screeners. The School District determines which grades will be screened as well as any children identified with a potential vision problem. This year, 950 children were vision screened. In 2015, the Club purchased a vision screening camera which provides a more accurate evaluation of the younger children and is also a quick and easy test for them.

Club members also like to enjoy themselves at the State and District Lions bowling tournaments. In 2003, Club members set a new State Lions record (old record set 56 years earlier) in winning the State tournament. Members also participate in various golf outings as well.

The Cudahy Lions Club currently has 56 members. Meetings are held on the 2 nd and 4 th Wednesdays of each month at 6:30PM. The Board of Directors meets on the 1 st Wednesday of each month at 6:30PM. All meetings are held at Joe&rsquos K-Ranch in Cudahy.

For more information about the Cudahy Lions Club, contact us at [email protected]


Slovaks

The Milwaukee area’s Slovak population dates from the 1880s, when economic dislocation at home and nationalist resistance to the Magyarization policies of the Austro-Hungarian Empire prompted immigrants to come to the United States in search of jobs and a better life.[1] At the time, labor agents from American industrial plants, including southeast Wisconsin’s Patrick Cudahy meat processing operation, sought labor from many areas of southern and eastern Europe.[2] The Slovak community has been small, with about 2,000 people in the metro area claiming a birthplace in Slovakia or a mother tongue of Slovak in 1920 and some 5,000 people claiming Slovak ancestry in the 1980 census.[3]

In the 1880s, many of the first Slovaks in the Milwaukee area settled in the Second Ward. Others settled in neighborhoods in Cudahy. As they did so, the community founded two Catholic parishes, St. Stephen, at 5 th and Walnut in Milwaukee in 1907, and St. Joseph, in Cudahy in 1909.[4] St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church also served the Slovak community in Cudahy.

There is some evidence that the Slovak community life also participated in the Czech Sokols, since the communities were similar in culture and language. In other cities, such as Philadelphia, the Sokols, which operated as a center of Czech intellectual and social life as well as gymnastics clubs, invited Slovaks into their membership. In the second decade of the twenty-first century, Milwaukee’s Sokol invites Slovaks into their organization and keeps Slovak cultural life healthy.[5] The area’s Sokol keeps alive Czech and Slovak ethnic identity through a number of functions, including gymnastics clubs, social organizations, and participation in the Holiday Folk Fair International.[6] The Wisconsin Slovak Historical Society, based in Cudahy, is dedicated to maintaining the history and culture of Slovak Americans. The organization operates the Slovak Heritage Museum in Cudahy, holds classes for people in the area to learn the Slovak language, and annually celebrates the Slovak-American Day at Croatian Park in Franklin.[7] The Tatra Slovak Dancers of Milwaukee practice traditional Slovak dances.[8] There is also a Milwaukee chapter of the Slovak Catholic Sokol, a “heritage focused” and “faith based” group founded in 1905 and intended to provide the local Slovak population with “sound financial protection and benefits.”[9]

Footnotes [+]

    “Slovaks,” United States Department of State, last accessed July 12, 2012 Anton Spiesz and Dusan Caplovic, Illustrated Slovak History: A Struggle for Sovereignty in Central Europe,” edited by Ladislaus J. Balchozy, translated by Joseph J. Palus, Jr., Albert Devine, David Daniel, Michael Kopanic, and Ivan Reguli (Wauconda, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2006), 90, 99-101 Marian Mark Stolarik, Immigration and Urbanization: The Slovak Experience, 1870-1918 (New York, NY: AMS Press, Inc., 1989), 6-7, 21, 26 “Slovaks in Wisconsin,” Dictionary of Wisconsin History, Wisconsin Historical Society, http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/dictionary/index.asp?action=view&term_id=11160&keyword=Slovak, last accessed July 12, 2012. “Cudahy: Brief History,” Dictionary of Wisconsin History, Wisconsin Historical Society, http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/dictionary/index.asp?action=view&term_id=15113&keyword=Cudahy, last accessed July 12, 2012 Stolarik, Immigration and Urbanization, 6-7, 21, 26. Data tabulated from Steven Ruggles, Katie Genadek, Ronald Goeken, Josiah Grover, and Matthew Sobek. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 6.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2015. “Cudahy: Brief History,” Dictionary of Wisconsin History, Wisconsin Historical Society, http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/dictionary/index.asp?action=view&term_id=15113&keyword=Cudahy, last accessed July 12, 2012 “Slovaks in Wisconsin,” Dictionary of Wisconsin History, Wisconsin Historical Society, http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/dictionary/index.asp?action=view&term_id=11160&keyword=Slovak, last accessed July 12, 2012 The First Catholic Slovak Union, Slovak Catholic Parishes and Institutions in the United States of America (Cleveland, OH: The Union, 1955). Robert M. Zecker, Streetcar Parishes: Slovak Immigrants Build Their Nonlocal Communities, 1890-1945 (Selinsgrove, PA: Susquehanna University Press, 2010), 92, 197 “Sokol Sokolice Milwaukee,” Sokol Milwaukee, http://www.sokol-milwaukee.org/index.html, last accessed June 12, 2012 Anton Daniel Acker, The Czech Community of Milwaukee, 1848-1998 (Milwaukee: Milwaukee County Historical Society 2001), 15-18, 29, 33-35. “Sokol Sokolice Milwaukee,” Sokol Milwaukee, http://www.sokol-milwaukee.org/index.html, last accessed June 12, 2012. “Home” and “Coming Events,” The Wisconsin Slovak Historical Society, http://wisconsinslovakhistoricalsociety.org/Home_Page.html, last accessed July 12, 2012, now available at http://www.wisconsinslovakhistoricalsociety.org/, last accessed July 31, 2017. “Tatra Slovak Dancers of Milwaukee,” Facebook, last accessed July 12, 2012. “Home,” “Local Lodges,” and “About Us,” Slovak Catholic Sokol website, last accessed July 12, 2012.

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Urban spelunking: Seeking new life at the old Kearney & Trecker plant West Allis


Company-Histories.com

Address:
5481 S. Packard Avenue
Cudahy, Wisconsin 53110
U.S.A.

Statistics:

Public Company
Incorporated: 1905
Employees: 1,130
Sales: $226.77 million (1998)
Stock Exchanges: NASDAQ
Ticker Symbol: LDSH
NAIC: 332116 Metal Stamping 336412 Jet Propulsion & Internal Combustion Engines & Parts, Aircraft, Manufacturing

Company Perspectives:

Ladish is a leading producer of highly engineered, technically advanced components for the jet engine, aerospace and general industrial markets. The Company is a market leader in manufacturing large, complex forged components.

Ladish Co., Inc. is a supplier of high-strength forgings for jet engines and other aerospace and industrial applications. The aerospace market accounts for about 90 percent of sales jet engine forgings alone account for 70 percent. The company's sales are concentrated in just a few major customers, such as Rolls-Royce, United Technologies (Pratt & Whitney), and General Electric.

According to the Ladish Co., Inc.'s official timeline, in 1905 Herman W. Ladish bought a steam hammer, setting himself on the track of becoming "Axle Forger to the Industry." Expansion, both in facilities and in product offerings, continued through the 1930s, when Ladish spent $1 million upgrading its plant and began doing its own machining. New products included aircraft brake drums.

During the war years, components for critical U.S. aircraft originated at Ladish's forge, including struts for B-26 bombers and propeller shafts for P-51 Mustangs. The company also supplied engine crankcases. In addition, it developed advanced, high-strength alloys and installed new hammers for forging them.

The company's patented D6 tool steel found its way into early rocket motors. By the end of the 1950s, Ladish had installed the world's largest counterblow hammer. The company was employing about 7,000 people in four plants.

A new plant was added in Kentucky in 1966, as the company continued to supply the space program. Ladish built a factory in Arkansas in 1975 to make industrial supplies. It continued to upgrade its Cudahy forging operation, making it larger and hotter. It produced steel-alloy forgings for use in nuclear equipment and oil wells.

Ladish was forced to contend with a strike in April 1979. While Ladish used alternate employees to keep its production lines moving, its clients such as General Electric searched for alternate sources. At the same time, two critical metals, titanium and cobalt, were in short supply. The strikes at Ladish and at Fafnir Bearing Co., another engine parts supplier, were settled in September.

Changing Hands in the 1980s

In July 1981, Armco Inc. of Middletown, Ohio, announced that it was buying a 53 percent interest in privately owned Ladish after highly secret negotiations. The stock acquisition agreement was originally worth $221 million, later upped to $286 million after ACF Industries of New York made its own offer. ACF already had purchased a five percent interest in Ladish in June. ACF increased its bid to $324 million in cash and stock in August. In preparation for the deal, the rather secretive Ladish revealed that it had sales of $486.3 million in 1980, surprising many analysts. Its earnings were $11.5 million.

This bidding war came at a slow period for the U.S. forging industry. Italy, West Germany, and Japan were beginning to develop considerable competition abroad. At home, Ladish was edged out of the leading independent producer slot by Wyman-Gordon of Worcester, Massachusetts, which posted 1980 sales of $550 million. Like the companies vying for control of Ladish, Wyman-Gordon was also bullish, however, investing $12.5 million in new tooling.

In November 1981, Armco received government approval for its takeover bid, then valued at $286 million worth of stock. Ladish's forging operation tied in nicely with Armco's alloy steel production and promised opportunities for further expansion. But it could not keep its prize acquisition for long. Struggling financially after years of losses in steel, oil-field equipment, and specialty materials, Armco sold Ladish to Owens Corning Corporation in 1985, along with Armco's other aerospace subsidiaries, Hitco (reinforced composites) and Oregon Metallurgical Corp. (titanium), in which Armco had an 80 percent share. The total purchase price was $415 million.

Although the Hitco expertise that initially attracted Owens Corning seemed like a good fit, some analysts wondered how well the other acquisitions, such as Ladish, would work with Owens Corning's existing businesses, centered around the stagnant construction industry. The new businesses gave Owens Corning an entry into the aerospace market, but also exposed it to the vagaries of defense spending.

Within two years, Owens Corning sold Ladish as it came under threat of a hostile takeover. Owens Corning, in fact, divested its entire Aerospace and Strategic Materials Group. An investment group, including members of Ladish management, then bought the company for $236 million. Investment bankers Gibbons, Green and van Amerongen and Salomon Brothers Inc. financed the deal.

The early 1990s were catastrophic for the aviation industry. The Persian Gulf War stifled world tourism and a global recession compounded difficulties. Privately owned Ladish experienced its worst losses ever and was losing market share rapidly. In 1992 Ladish closed its Los Angeles forging operation as a result, eliminating 188 jobs. The closing left the company with three facilities, in Wisconsin, Kentucky, and Arkansas.

Payments on the buyback debt ($110 million in junk bonds) forced Ladish into bankruptcy in 1993. It emerged from bankruptcy protection in April. Although just two months in Chapter 11, Ladish suffered a lasting stigma, given the industry's preference for long-term contracts.

Ladish lost between $15 million and $20 million a year in 1994 and 1995, on sales of $122 million and $115 million, respectively. Lagging a few years behind its larger competitors, the company embarked upon a massive competitiveness campaign. After turning to outside consultants for guidance, it initiated many of the employee empowerment measures popular at the time. Ladish kept employees notified of financial and marketing information via e-mail memos and periodic staff meetings. It also started an incentive payment plan.

The company employed "synchronous manufacturing" techniques of controlling work flow throughout its plants. Process improvements included reducing batch sizes. "Process mapping" involved input from all levels of production workers with the aim of removing unnecessary steps. Speaking to Aviation Week and Space Technology, a company executive characterized "the speed issue" as the key to improving costs as well as performance. Ladish also attempted to coordinate such improvements across the whole supply chain, from vendors to customers.

Ladish teamed with Paramount, California-based Weber to enter new markets. Weber's 35,000-ton hydraulic press was more than twice the size of any of Ladish's. Weber aimed to capitalize upon Ladish's position in the jet engine forging market. Although in this instance another company brought a unique piece of equipment to the deal, Ladish was already the sole source for several products, such as certain massive rocket engine parts. Ladish had some of the industry's largest presses and hammers.

Kerry L. Woody was named president in 1996. The company employed 1,075 at the time. Annual sales were $162 million, with profits of $2.1 million. During the year, Ladish sold its industrial products division to Trinity Industries for $36.5 million to better focus on its core business. The company bought Stowe Machine Co., Inc. in Windsor, Connecticut, for $9.5 million. That site employed 40, making jet engine components. Rival Wyman-Gordon bought Cameron Forged Products from Cooper Industries, reducing the number of competitors, but making Wyman, already the industry leader, an even larger player. Shortly after Ladish's Kentucky plant flooded in March 1997, the company announced that it was selling its pipe fittings division, which also included a plant in Arkansas.

As a result of Ladish's competitiveness regimen, by 1997 the company was acting like a lean, world-class supplier. Lead times and on-time deliveries improved drastically, and the company handled its raw materials inventories more efficiently as well. In addition, the aircraft industry as a whole was facing a boom time. A thousand employees enjoyed profit-sharing bonuses averaging $2,000 as a result of the improvements. The workforce had been cut in half during Ladish's retooling.

In late 1997, the company announced plans to sell some of its stock on the market to raise capital and to enhance shareholder liquidity. Some shares, given to creditors in its bankruptcy settlement, already had been trading over the counter. The IPO was initially planned for $60 million worth of shares, later increased to $115 million.

The $86 million IPO in March 1998 raised $29 million. Ladish President Kerry Woody told the Business Journal of Milwaukee that the company had finally "arrived." A couple of months later, however, one of the major investing groups disbanded, sending share prices tumbling.

Ladish spent $1.6 million to upgrade its 15,000-ton hydraulic forging press in May 1998. By August it was planning a stock buyback and looking for other machining and forging companies to acquire to increase its product line and make its stock more attractive. At this time, the company was practically debt-free and aiming for 40 percent growth by 2000, mostly through acquisitions. Although the Asian financial crisis had begun to affect sales at Boeing and Airbus, sales of helicopters and business and regional jets were increasing. The company also had a steady business in replacement parts.

The booming commercial aviation market in the late 1990s kept suppliers working at full capacity. This led many to focus on improving on-time performance rather than worry about market share, according to a Ladish market survey. Manufacturers also chose to enter longer agreements with fewer vendors.

Ladish announced that it was cooperating with the Chinese aviation industry in 1998. It arranged to buy 1,200 tons of titanium ingot from Sino-Titanium. In July 1998, Ladish teamed with Falk Corp. to build a 30-ton gear for an Army Corps of Engineers hydroelectric power facility.

Concerned the company was being undervalued in the stock market, Ladish management announced that the company was buying back more shares in August 1998, further increased by 50 percent the following May. The company also instituted a poison pill plan in September 1998 to ward off potential takeover attempts.

On December 2, 1998, Boeing announced that it was cutting production 25 percent and laying off 48,000 workers. The worse-than-expected news worried suppliers on all levels of the still recovering aviation industry. To further compound Ladish's difficulties, the firm's 10,000-ton thermal press broke down later that month. The press was down for nearly three months, costing several million dollars in repairs and millions more in lost revenues. Afterward, Ladish was able to boast higher efficiency from the repaired equipment. The company also suffered the loss of partner Weber Metal's huge 38,000-ton press, however, which was down due to a cracked cylinder. The joint venture had just begun to show results, accounting for four percent of Ladish's total 1998 revenue.

Ladish posted profits of about $24 million a year in 1997 and 1998. Annual sales had climbed past $200 million. By early 1999, Ladish was reporting drastically reduced earnings, in part due to its press failure. Earnings continued to fall into the second quarter. As business slowed, Ladish offered its aging workforce retirement incentives. It then brought back apprenticeship programs to deal with a generational shortage of skilled labor. Despite all this, Ladish continued to invest for the future, buying precision machiner Adco Manufacturing of South Windsor, Connecticut. Adco employed about 30 people and was to be folded into Stowe.

Principal Subsidiaries: Stowe Machine Co., Inc.

Principal Operating Units: Advanced Materials and Process Technology Group.

"Aerospace Purchasers Take Broad, Long-Term View," Purchasing, October 9, 1997.
Camia, Catalina, and Dale D. Buss, "Owens-Corning to Buy Armco Business in Aerospace Materials for $415 Million," Wall Street Journal, August 19, 1985, p. 1.
Gallun, Alby, "Area Aircraft Suppliers Hold Breath for Boeing Cuts," Business Journal of Milwaukee, December 14, 1998.
----, "Bucyrus, Ladish Emerge from Chapter 11 Shadow," Business Journal of Milwaukee, March 10, 1997.
----, "Firms Face Mass Retirements As Work Force Ages," Business Journal of Milwaukee, March 1, 1999.
----, "Ladish Files to Become Public Company," Business Journal of Milwaukee, December 29, 1997.
----, "Stock Buyback Plans: Investment Tools or Smoke Screens?," Business Journal of Milwaukee, September 14, 1998.
----, "Stock Offering Helps Ladish Take Off," Business Journal of Milwaukee, April 13, 1998.
"Ladish Forges Ahead As Aerospace Rallies," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, December 2, 1996.
"Ladish Seeks Close Ties with Rocket Designers," Space News, June 2, 1997.
Lank, Avrum, "Stock Sale Could Net Ladish Co. of Cudahy, Wis., $35 Million," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, December 24, 1997.
Mullins, Robert, "Ladish to Sell Fittings Division," Business Journal of Milwaukee, March 24, 1997.
Rohan, Thomas M., "A Hush-Hush Deal for a Secretive Company," Industry Week, July 27, 1981, p. 17.
Savage, Mark, "Cudahy, Wis.-Based Jet Engine Parts Maker Ladish Co. Plans Stock Buyback," Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, August 26, 1998.
Schlesinger, Jacob M., "Owens-Corning to Sell Ladish Unit for $236 Million," Wall Street Journal, January 21, 1987, p. 1.
"'Strategic Buyers' Having Hard Time Finding Good Deals," Business Journal-Milwaukee, April 24, 1998.
Velocci, Anthony L., Jr., "Aerospace Suppliers Preoccupied with Possible Cyclical Downturn," Aviation Week and Space Technology, May 31, 1999, p. 64.
----, "Ladish Turnaround: Lesson for Industry," Aviation Week and Space Technology, June 9, 1997, pp. 70--71.
----, "Survey Highlights Conflicting Priorities Among Suppliers," Aviation Week and Space Technology, August 10, 1998, p. 66.
Wetmore, Warren C., "Supplier Strikes Worry Engine Makers," Aviation Week and Space Technology, July 23, 1979, p. 22.

Source: International Directory of Company Histories , Vol. 30. St. James Press, 2000.


Joseph Cudahy Str - History

WI - Wisconsin Catholic Heritage 1848-1948 German - 48 p. CAPH031 -
WI Abrams - St Louis- 1910- 1960 - PPHC108 -
WI Abrams - St Louis- 1910- 1960 - PPHC108 -
WI Algoma - Immaculate Conception- 1860- 1910 Bohemian - PPHC100 -
WI Allouez - St Matthew- 1922- 1972 - PPHC122 -
WI Antigo - St Hyacinth- 1895- 1970 - PPHC100 -
WI Antigo - St John- 1880- 1930 - PPHC100 -
WI Antigo - St John's Church- 1830- 1930 - 139 p CAPH030 -
WI Appleton - Sacred Heart- 1898- 1973 - PPHC100 -
WI Appleton - St Joseph- 1877- 1902 German - PPHC100 -
WI Appleton - St Joseph- 1943 - Archive BX 4603.A682 S3 -
WI Appleton - St Joseph's Church- 1877- 1902 German - 100p. CAPH030 -
WI Armstrong - Our Lady of Angels- 1856- 1931 Irish - PPHC100 -
WI Ashland - St Agnes- 1873- 1973 - 59 p. CAPH -
WI Ashland - St Agnes- 1886- 1973 - PPHC100 -
WI Ashland - St Agnes Church- 1885- 1935 - 1 v. CAPH - BX4603.A826 S1 -
WI Ashland - St Agnes Parish- 1873- 1973 - 59 p. CAPH030 -
WI Bay Settlement - Our Lady of Good Help- 1943 - PFCL - 80/2836 -
WI Beaver Dam - St Patrick- 1860- 1935 Irish - PPHC100 -
WI Big Bend - St Joseph- 1924- 1949 - PPHC100 -
WI Big Bend - St Joseph's Parish- 1924- 1949 - 63 p. CAPH - BX4603.B592.S1 -
WI Big Bend - St Joseph's Parish- 1924- 1949 - 63 p. CAPH030 -
WI Big River - St Mary- 1872- 1972 - PPHC122 -
WI Black River Falls - St Joseph- 1871- 1971 - PPHC122 -
WI Brighton - St Francis Xavier - c1892-1906 - PPHC100 -
WI Brighton - St Patrick- 184801906 - PPHC100 -
WI Bristol - St Scholastica- 1866- 1961 - PPHC100 -
WI Bristol - St Scholastica- 1961 - 37 p. CAPH030 -
WI Brookfield - St John Vianney- 1956- 1958 - PPHC100 -
WI Brookfield - St John Vianney Church- 1958 - 8 p. CAPH030 -
WI Burlington - Immaculate Conception- 1844- 1944 German - PPHC100 -
WI Burlington - Immaculate Conception- 1844- 1944 German? 100 p CAPH - pBX4603.B961 S1 -
WI Burlington - Immaculate Conception- 1844- 1944 German? 100 p CAPH030 -
WI Burlington - Immaculate Conception- 1845- 1920 German - 40 p. CAPH030 -
WI Burlington - St Mary- 1844- 1944 - PPHC100 -
WI Butler - St Agnes- 1915- 1965 - PPHC100 -
WI Butler - St Agnes Parish- 1915- 1965 - 26 p. CAPH031 -
WI Campbellsport - St Matthew- 1864- 1964 - PPHC101 -
WI Campbellsport - St Matthew's Congregation- 1864- 1964 German? 20 p. CAPH031 -
WI Campbellsport - St Matthew's Parish- 1864- 1939 - 48 p. CAPH - BX4603.C192 S1 -
WI Campbellsport - St Matthew's Parish- 1864- 1939 German? 48 p. CAPH031 -
WI Casimir - St Casimir- 1871- 1971 - PPHC122 -
WI Cecil - St Martin- 1898- 1973 - PPHC122 -
WI Clyman - St John the Baptist- 1900- 1950 German Irish - PPHC101 -
WI Clyman - St John the Baptist- 1900- 1950 German - 43 p. CAPH031 -
WI Cross Plains - St Francis Xavier- 1953- 1928 German - PPHC101 -
WI Cross Plains - St Francis Xavier Parish- 1853- 1928 - 53 p. CAPH - BX4603.M182 S8 -
WI Cross Plains - St Mary- 1852- 1960 - PPHC101 -
WI Cudahy - Holy Family- 1900- 1958 Polish - 48 p. CAPH031 -
WI Cudahy - St Frederick- 1959/0419 - PPHC101 -
WI Cudahy - St Joseph- 1964/0614 Slovak - PPHC101 -
WI Dacada - St Nicholas- 1848- 1948 - 96 p. CAPH031 -
WI Dacada - St Nicholas- 1848- 1973 - 7 p. CAPH031 -
WI De Pere - St Francis Xavier- 1864- 1972 - PPHC122 -
WI De Pere - St Joseph- 1870- 1970 - PPHC122 -
WI Deerbrook - St Wencel- 1897- 1972 - PPHC122 -
WI Durand - St Mary- 1876- 1944 - PPHC101 -
WI East Bristol - St Joseph- 1847- 1907 German - PPHC101 -
WI East Troy - St Peter- 1851- 1954 German Irish - PPHC101 -
WI East Troy - St Peter's Church- 1854- 1954 - 48 p. CAPH - BX1418.Ea78 Sch95 -
WI East Troy - St Peter's Church- 1854- 1954 German Scotch, 48 p. CAPH031 -
WI Eau Claire - St James the Greater- 1951/0421 - PPHC101 -
WI Edgar - St John the Baptist- 1899- 1974 German - 59 p. CAPH -
WI Edgerton - St Joseph- 1870- 1970 - PPHC101 -
WI Edgerton - St Joseph's Parish- 1859- 1963 - 20 p. CAPH031 -
WI Edgerton - St Joseph's Parish- 1870- 1970 - 110 p CAPH031 -
WI Ettrick - St Bridget- 1870- 1970 - PPHC122 -
WI Evansville - St Paul- 1906- 1956 - PPHC101 -
WI Evansville - St Paul Church- 1906- 1956 - 28 p. CAPH031 -
WI Fairview - St Joseph- 1870- 1970 - PPHC122 -
WI Fort Atkinson - St Joseph- 1884- 1959 - PPHC101 -
WI Francis Creek - St Anne- 1872- 1972 - PPHC122 -
WI Francis Creek - St Anne- 1872- 1972 - PPHC122 -
WI Goldendale - St Boniface- 1845- 1945 German PPHC101 -
WI Goldendale - St Boniface- 1845- 1945 German - PPHC101 -
WI Goldendale - St Boniface- 1845- 1945 German - 32 p. CAPH031 -
WI Green Bay - Diocesan Dept. of Education 1928-1978 - 28 p. CAPH031 -
WI Green Bay - St Edward's Parish- 1848- 1949 - 94 p. CAPH - BX4603.G798 S26 -
WI Green Bay - St Francis Xavier Cathedral 1851-1969 - 1 v. CAPH -
WI Greenfield - St Matthias- 1850- 1951 German PPHC101 -
WI Greenfield - St Matthias- 1850- 1951 German - PPHC101 -
WI Greenfield - St Matthias- 1851- 1951 German - 82 p. CAPH031 -
WI Halder - St Patrick- 1871- 1971 - PPHC122 -
WI Halder - St Patrick- 1871- 1971 - PPHC122 -
WI Hales Corners - St Mary- 1842- 1967 Irish PPHC102 -
WI Hales Corners - St Mary- 1842- 1967 Irish - PPHC102 -
WI Hartford - St Kilian- 1863- 1963 German Irish PPHC102 -
WI Hartford - St Kilian- 1863- 1963 German Irish - PPHC102 -
WI Highland - St Philip- 1846- 1946 - PPHC102 -
WI Highland - St Philip- 1846- 1946 - PPHC102 -
WI Hofa Park - St Stanislaus- 1902- 1973 - PPHC122 -
WI Hofa Park - St Stanislaus- 1902- 1973 - PPHC122 -
WI Holland - St Francis Seraph Church - 64 p. CAPH - BX1418.H719.F847 A3s -
WI Janesville - St John Vianney- 1955- 1965 - PPHC102 -
WI Janesville - St John Vianney- 1955- 1965 - PPHC102 -
WI Janesville - St John Vianney Church- 1965 - Irish - 36 p. CAPH031 -
WI Janesville - St Mary- 1876- 1926 German PPHC102 -
WI Janesville - St Mary- 1876- 1926 German - PPHC102 -
WI Janesville - St Patrick- 1850- 1925 Irish PPHC102 -
WI Janesville - St Patrick- 1850- 1925 Irish - PPHC102 -
WI Jefferson - St John the Baptist- 1859- 1934 - PPHC102 -
WI Jefferson - St John the Baptist- 1859- 1934 - PPHC102 -
WI Jefferson - St Lawrence- 1850- 1950 German PPHC102 -
WI Jefferson - St Lawrence- 1850- 1950 German - PPHC102 -
WI Jerico - Holy Trinity- 1870- 1970 - PPHC122 -
WI Jerico - Holy Trinity- 1870- 1970 - PPHC122 -
WI Johnsburg - St John the Baptist - 44 p. CAPH - Bx4603 J65 B6 -
WI Johnsburg - St John the Baptist- 1843- 1980 German - 128 p CAPH031 BX4603.J6 S3 1980 -
WI Johnsburg - St John the Baptist- 1845- 1967 - PPHC102 -
WI Johnsburg - St John the Baptist- 1845- 1967 - PPHC102 -
WI Johnsburg - St John the Baptist- 1851- 1980 - 128 p CAPH - BX4603.J6 S3 1980 -
WI Johnsburg - St John the Baptist- 1857- 1957 - 44 p. CAPH - BX4603.J65 B6 -
WI Johnsburg - St John the Baptist- 1857- 1957 German - 44 p. CAPH031 -
WI Juneau - St Mary- 1875- 1925 - PPHC102 -
WI Kellnerville - St Joseph- 1870- 1970 - PPHC122 -
WI Kenosha - St James- 1883- 1933 Irish PPHC102 -
WI Kimberly - Holy Name of Jesus- 1907- 1062 - PPHC102 -
WI Kimberly - Holy Name of Jesus- 1961- 1962 - 12 p. CAPH031 -
WI La Crosse - Diocese of La Crosse- 1868- 1968 - 215 p CAPH - BX1417.L376 1969 -
WI La Crosse - Holy Trinity- 1887- 1912 German PPHC102 -
WI La Crosse - St John the Baptist- 1888- 1938 German PPHC102 -
WI La Crosse - St John the Baptist- 1888- 1938 German - 92 p. CAPH031 -
WI Lac Du Flambeau - St Anthony - c1895-1972 - PPHC122 -
WI Lancaster - St Clement- 1859- 1959 German Irish PPHC102 -
WI Little Chute - St John- 1836- 1936 Dutch PPHC102 -
WI Mackville - St Edward- 1874- 1970 - PPHC103 -
WI Mackville - St Edward's Church- 1849- 1949 German - 97 p. CAPH031 -
WI Madison - Holy Redeemer- 1857- 1932 German PPHC103 -
WI Madison - Holy Redeemer Church- 1857- 1932 German,French - 30 p. CAPH031 -
WI Madison - St Bernard- 1908- 1958 - PPHC103 -
WI Madison - St Bernard Congregation- 1908- 1958 - 36 p. CAPH031 -
WI Madison - St Dennis School - 29 p. CAPH032 -
WI Madison - St Erloser - Archive Local History -
WI Madison - St James- 1905- 1955 German PPHC103 -
WI Madison - St Patrick- 1888- 1958 Irish PPHC103 -
WI Madison - St Patrick's Church- 1888- 1958 Irish - 119 p CAPH032 -
WI Madison - St Patrick's School- 1959 - 1 v. CAPH032 -
WI Manitowac - St Boniface- 1853- 1953 German Irish - 47 p. CAPH -
WI Manitowoc - St Joseph- 1872- 1972 - PPHC122 -
WI Mapleton - St Catherine- 1847- 1947 - PPHC103 -
WI Marshall - St Mary- 1910- 1960 - PPHC103 -
WI Marshfield - Our Lady of Peace- 1947- 1972 - PPHC122 -
WI Menomonee Falls - St Mary- 1904- 1954 - PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - Blessed Sacrament- 1927- 1952 Polish - 80 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - Blessed Sacrament- 1927- 1956 Polish PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - Blessed Sacrament- 1956 - Polish - 40 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - De Sales Prep Seminary- 1963 - 1 v. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - Diocese of Milwaukee- 1926 - 194 p CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - Holy Angels- 1914- 1939 - PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - Holy Ghost- 1902- 1952 German PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - Holy Name Society- 1933 - 95 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - Holy Redeemer- 1897- 1947 - PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - Holy Redeemer Parish- 1897- 1947 - 108 p CAPH - BX4603.M369 H7 -
WI Milwaukee - Holy Trinity- 1850- 1950 German PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - Holy Trinity Church- 1850- 1925 German - 97 p. CAPH - BX4603.M662.B8 -
WI Milwaukee - Holy Trinity Church- 1850=1925 German - 97 p. CAPH -
WI Milwaukee - Immaculate Conception- 1871- 1946 - PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - Sacred Heart- 1868- 1918 - PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - Ss Peter and Paul- 1889- 1939 German PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Adalbert- 1898- 1948 Polish PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - St Agnes- 1925- 1961 - PPHC103 -
WI Milwaukee - St Agnes Church- 1961 - 20 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - St Alexander- 1925- 1975 Polish PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Anthony- 1872- 1945 German PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Anthony- 1942 - PFCL - 77/2681 -
WI Milwaukee - St Anthony's Church- 1872- 1897 German - 52 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - St Augustine- 1888- 1938 German PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Augustine's Parish- 1888- 1938 German - 80 p. CAPH - BX4603.M369 S1 -
WI Milwaukee - St Augustine's Parish- 1888- 1938 German - 80 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - St Barbara- 1921- 1960 - PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Benedict the Moor- 1902- 1912 Black - 32 p. CAPH - BX4603.M369 S2 -
WI Milwaukee - St Benedict the Moor- 1902- 1912 Black - 32 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - St Benedict the Moor- 1912 - PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Boniface- 1888- 1938 German PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Boniface Church- 1888- 1938 German - 40 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - St Boniface Church- 1888- 1938 German - 64 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - St Catherine- 1922- 1972 - PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Catherine's Parish- 1923- 1945 - 10 p. CAPH032 -
WI Milwaukee - St Francis- 1870- 1946 German PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Francis Church- 1870- 1920 German - 120 p CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St Francis Church- 1871- 1946 German - 145 p CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St Francis Seminary- 1856- 1906 German - 93 p. CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St Francis Seminary- 1856- 1956 German - 39 p. CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St Francis of Assisi- 1870- 1895 German - 130 p CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St George- 1919 - Syrian PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Hedwig- 1871- 1971 Polish PPHC104 -
WI Milwaukee - St Hedwig's Church- 1871- 1971 Polish - 32 p. CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St Hyacinth- 1883- 1958 - PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St James- 1857- 1957 German PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St John- 1847- 1897 - PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St John De Nepomuc- 1866- 1942 Czech PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St John's Cathedral- 1847- 1897 - 240 p CAPH - BX4603.M662 J6 -
WI Milwaukee - St John's Cathedral- 1847- 1897 - 240 p CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St John's Cathedral- 1847- 1922 - 92 p. CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St John's Cathedral- 1847- 1947 - 127 p CAPH033 -
WI Milwaukee - St Josaphat- 1901- 1976 Polish PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St Joseph- 1855- 1905 German PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St Joseph- 1931 - PFCL - 82/2973 -
WI Milwaukee - St Joseph's Church- 1855- 1905 German - 204 p CAPH034 -
WI Milwaukee - St Lawrence- 1888- 1938 - PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St Lawrence Church- 1888- 1938 - 64 p. CAPH034 -
WI Milwaukee - St Leo- 1909- 1934 - PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St Leo's Parish- 1909- 1934 German - 43 p. CAPH034 -
WI Milwaukee - St Margaret Mary- 1955- 1957 - PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St Mary- 1846- 1971 German PPHC122 -
WI Milwaukee - St Mary- 1921 - PGEN - 0165 -
WI Milwaukee - St Mary Magdalen- 1925- 1950 Polish PPHC105 -
WI Milwaukee - St Mary's Church- 1849- 1921 German - 112 p CAPH -
WI Milwaukee - St Matthew- 1892- 1942 - PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Matthew's Parish- 1892- 1942 - 23 p. CAPH034 -
WI Milwaukee - St Michael- 1883- 1933 - PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Michael's Church- 1883- 1933 - 36 p. CAPH034 -
WI Milwaukee - St Paul- 1904 - PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Raphael - c1900 - PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Robert- 1912- 1962 - PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Roman- 1956- 1960 - PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Rose of Lima- 1888- 1963 - PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Sebastian- 1911- 1936 - PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Sebastian Church- 1911- 1936 - 47 p. CAPH034 -
WI Milwaukee - St Sebastian Parish- 1911- 1936 - 47 p. CAPH - BX4603.M662 S4 -
WI Milwaukee - St Stanislaus- 1866- 1966 Polish PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Stanislaus- 1866- 1966 Polish - 31 p. CAPH034 -
WI Milwaukee - St Stephen- 1847- 1947 German PPHC122 -
WI Milwaukee - St Stephen's Church- 1847- 1947 German - [31]p CAPH034 2 copies -
WI Milwaukee - St Vincent de Paul- 1888- 1963 Polish PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St Vincent de Paul- 1888- 1963 Polish - 72 p. CAPH034 -
WI Milwaukee - St Wenceslaus- 1883- 1958 Bohemian PPHC106 -
WI Milwaukee - St. Leo's Parish- 1909- 1934 German - 43 p. CAPH034 -
WI Montello - St John the Baptist- 1851- 1926 - PPHC106 -
WI Navarino - St Lawrence- 1920- 1970 - PPHC123 -
WI Nazianz - Salvatorian Fathers- 1896- 1946 - 41 p. CAPH035 -
WI New Berlin - Holy Apostles- 1855- 1955 German PPHC106 -
WI New Coeln - St Stephen- 1847- 1947 - PPHC106 -
WI New Franken - St Kilian- 1851- 1926 - PPHC106 -
WI New Franklin - St Kilian- 1851- 1926 - 66 p. CAPH034 -
WI Newburg - Holy Trinity- 1859- 1934 - PPHC106 -
WI Newburg - Holy Trinity Parish- 1859- 1934 German - 80 p. CAPH034 -
WI Oak Crook - St Matthew- 1916 - PGEN - 0163 -
WI Oconto - St Joseph- 1870- 1950 - PPHC107 -
WI Oregon - Holy Mother of Consolation 1856-1956 - PPHC107 -
WI Oshkosh - St Josaphat- 1897- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI Oshkosh - St Mary- 1860- 1935 German PPHC107 -
WI Oshkosh - St Mary's Parish- 1860- 1935 German - 76 p. CAPH034 -
WI Park Falls - St Anthony- 1904- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI Patch Grove - St John's Mission- 1841- 1941 - PPHC107 -
WI Perry - Holy Redeemer Mission- 1861- 1961 - PPHC107 -
WI Plain - St Luke- 1857- 1957 - PPHC107 -
WI Plainfield - St Paul- 1898- 1973 - PPHC123 -
WI Plover - St Bronislava- 189701972 - PPHC123 -
WI Plymouth - St John the Baptist- 1861- 1962 - PPHC107 -
WI Port Washington - St Mary- 1853- 1953 - PPHC107 -
WI Portage - St Mary- 1843- 1959 - PPHC107 -
WI Potosi - St Andrew- 1910 - PPHC107 -
WI Poygan - St Thomas- 1860- 1970 - PPHC123 -
WI Prairie du Chien - St Gabriel- 1836- 1936 - PPHC107 -
WI Prairie du Chien - St Gabriel's Parish- 1836- 1936 Fr,German,Irish 61 p. CAPH - BX1418.P884 Sca63c -
WI Prairie du Chien - St Gabriel's Parish- 1836- 1936 Fr,German,Irish 61 p. CAPH034 -
WI Prairie du Sac - Our Lady of New Frauenthal 1958 - PFCL - 80/2866 -
WI Prescott - St Joseph- 1905- 1937 - PPHC107 -
WI Racine - St John Nepomucene- 1896- 1946 Czech PPHC107 -
WI Racine - St Joseph- 1875- 1937 - PPHC107 -
WI Racine - St Marien Church- 1852- 1902 German - 80 p. CAPH035 -
WI Racine - St Mary- 1852- 1902 German PPHC107 -
WI Racine - St Mary's Parish- 1852- 1902 German - 79 p. CAPH - BX4603.R121 S3 -
WI Racine - St Stanislaus- 1906- 1957 Polish PPHC107 -
WI Reedsburg - Sacred Heart- 1878- 1928 - PPHC107 -
WI Reedsburg - Sacred Heart Parish- 1878- 1928 - 46 p. CAPH035 -
WI Rhinelander - St Mary- 1888- 1970 - PPHC123 -
WI Rib Lake - St John the Baptist- 1897- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI Ripon - St Patrick- 1858- 1958 Irish PPHC107 -
WI Rising Sun - St James- 1872- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI River Falls - St Bridget- 1870- 1970 - PPHC123 -
WI Sanborn - St Anne- 1896- 1971 - PPHC123 -
WI Seneca - St Patrick- 1872- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI Sheboygan - Holy Name- 1848- 1945 German PPHC108 -
WI Sheboygan - Holy Name Church- 1868- 1968 German - 37 p. CAPH035 -
WI Sheboygan - St Clement- 1914- 1954 Irish PPHC108 -
WI Sheboygan - St Peter Claver- 1888- 1963 German PPHC108 -
WI Sobieski - St John Cantius- 1897- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI Soldiers Grove - St Philip- 1859- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI South Wayne - St John- 1960/0522 - PPHC108 -
WI St Cloud - St Claudius- 1870- 1945 - PPHC108 -
WI St Cloud - St Claudius- 1870- 1945 German? 19 p. CAPH035 -
WI St Francis - Sacred Heart of Jesus- 1868- 1918 German - 50 p. CAPH035 -
WI St Francis - St Francis Seminary- 1856- 1931 German - 168 p CAPH035 -
WI St Kilian - St Kilian- 1848- 1948 - PPHC108 -
WI St Kilian - St Kilian's Parish- 1848- 1948 German? 63 p. CAPH035 -
WI St Lawrence - St Lawrence- 1846- 1946 German PPHC108 -
WI St Lawrence - St Lawrence Congregation- 1846- 1946 German - 90 p. CAPH035 -
WI St Mary's Ridge - St Mary- 1856- 1931 German PPHC108 -
WI Stevens Point - St Peter- 1876- 1951 Polish PPHC108 -
WI Stiles - St Patrick- 1885- 1960 - PPHC108 -
WI Stoughton - St Ann- 1959/0419 Irish PPHC108 -
WI Sun Prairie - Sacred Heart- 1863- 1938 German PPHC109 -
WI Suring - St Michael- 1912- 1987 - 1 v. CAPH -
WI Tennyson - St Andrew- 1846- 1946 German PPHC109 -
WI Two Rivers - St Luke- 1851- 1951 - PPHC109 -
WI Two Rivers - St Luke- 1851- 1951 - PPHC123 -
WI Two Rivers - St Luke's Church- 1851- 1951 German - 89 p. CAPH035 -
WI Vermont - St James- 1860- 1960 - PPHC109 -
WI Watertown - St Bernard - Archive Local History -
WI Watertown - St Bernard- 1846- 1946 - PPHC123 -
WI Watertown - St Bernard- 1846- 1946 - Archive BX 4603.W35 S3 -
WI Watertown - St Bernard's Church- 1844- 1936 - 207 p CAPH - BX1418.W319 C851h -
WI Watertown - St Heinrich- 1853- 1903 - PPHC109 -
WI Waukesha - St Joseph- 1849- 1949 - PPHC109 -
WI Waukesha - St Joseph's Parish- 1849- 1949 - 160 p CAPH035 -
WI Wausau - Holy Name- 1946- 1971 - PPHC123 -
WI Wauwatosa - Christ the King- 1939- 1941 - PPHC109 -
WI Wauwatosa - St Bernard- 1911- 1963 - PPHC109 -
WI Wauwatosa - St Bernard's Congregation- 1911- 1963 - 16 p. CAPH035 -
WI Wauwatosa - St Jude the Apostle- 1927- 1957 - PPHC109 -
WI West Allis - Holy Assumption- 1902- 1952 - PPHC109 -
WI West Allis - St Aloysius- 1946- 1956 - PPHC123 -
WI West Allis - St Aloysius- 1957 - PPHC109 -
WI West Allis - St Aloysius Church- 1956- 1957 - 27 p. CAPH035 -
WI West Allis - St Mathias- 1850- 1926 - PPHC109 -
WI West Allis - St Rita- 1924- 1949 - PPHC109 -
WI West Allis - St Rita's Parish- 1924- 1949 - 114 p CAPH035 -
WI Westport - St Mary of the Lake- 1866- 1966 - PPHC109 -
WI Weyerhauser - Ss Peter and Paul- 1897- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI Whitelaw - St Michael- 1872- 1972 - PPHC123 -
WI Winneconne - St Mary- 1865- 1970 - PPHC123 -


The Falk Corporation

The Falk corporation was one of several Milwaukee factories that had its own foundry. Here, workers pour molten steel into a cast Falk used to make the wide variety of industrial gear drives the company manufactured. Falk was sold to Milwaukee-based Rexnord in 2005, and still exists today as one of its parent company’s brands. Though jobs have been cut in recent years, about 2,500 of Rexnord’s 7,300 employees are still based in and around Milwaukee. The foundry, on Canal St., remains operational.
Courtesy Milwaukee Public Library


Loyola University Chicago

New Lands in North America Explored and Evangelized by Fathers of the Society of Jesus

Artist: John Warner Norton (1876-1934)

This mural by John W. Norton (with assistance from his students Tom Lea and June Knabel) is conceived as a pictorial cartographical record of Jesuit missionary activity in the Great Lakes region and the Upper Mississippi Valley during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It is loosely based on the map created by Jacques Marquette, S.J., during his explorations in 1673-1674. Legends are in French but the title is in Latin. All personal names (except Joliet) are of Jesuit missionaries. The events depict are selective as no attempt was made to create a comprehensive map.

Scenes and events depicted on the mural:

1. The arrival at Sault-Ste-Marie in Upper Michigan of St. Isaac Jogues and Charles Raymbault, the first Jesuit missionaries to reach the Middle United States.

2. The mission of La Pointe on Lake Superior, Northern Wisconsin, founded by Claude Allouez, 1665.

3. The mission of St. Francis Xavier, Green Bay, Wisconsin, also founded by Claude Allouez, 1668.

4 Claude Dablon at St. Ignace, Upper Michigan, 1670.

5. Louis Joliet and Jacques Marquette, discoverers of the Upper Mississippi at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, 1673.

6. The same at the mouth of the Arkansas, the Lower Mississippi, 1673.

7. Marquette's wintering on the site of modern Chicago, 1674-1675.

8. The first Kaskaskia mission, established by Marquette on the Illinois River, 1675.

9. Death of Marquette on the east shore of Lake Michigan, 1675.

10. The Miami-Potawatomi mission on the St. Joseph River in the vicinity of Niles, Michigan, founded about 1689.

11. The mission of the Guardian Angel on a site within the present municipal limits of Chicago, opened about 1696.

12. The mission of St. Francis Xavier on the Wabash River (present Vincennes, Indiana). First priest known to have visited the site, the Jesuit Guyenne, 1734.

13. Joseph Pierre de Bonnecamps on the Ohio, 1749. His map of the region that subsequently became Ohio is the earliest extant.

Renovation of the Mural

In the mid-2000s the Cudahy Library reading room was renovated. As part of this project the mural was taken down and cleaned. While the mural was down, the balcony and clock that had been in the middle of the mural were removed and the resulting empty spaces were painted in as part of the mural.


Puppy stage: By 6 months

By this age, your growing puppy should be well-versed in several lessons.

Training goal No. 3: Polite play

Puppies who learn the lesson of polite play know when to stop (and can follow the “drop it” command), what’s off-limits, and understand what “no biting” means. While your puppy is still teething at this stage and likely has a strong desire to bite and chew things, they should know which household items are toys for playing and which objects are not—for instance, your body and clothing.

“Of course, all this must be done using force-free training,” says Naito.

Training goal No. 4: Housetraining

“This may be a work in progress for several months, but your puppy should be making steady progress with going potty in the appropriate places,” says Naito.

Training goal No. 5: Being alone

Whether through crate training or leaving your puppy in another type of safe, enclosed place, Naito says the goal is to ensure your puppy can stand being left alone for short periods of time.

Training goal No. 6: Recall

Getting dogs to respond to the command “come” early on is important, says Naito. “Even if your puppy doesn’t have a rocket recall, the important thing is that he loves coming right up to you.”

Training goal No. 7: Continued impulse control

By this age, puppies should ask politely for all of their favorite things by sitting first—that means sitting before getting food, engaging in playtime, and so on. “If your puppy is barking, jumping, or nipping for your attention, you’re setting him up for trouble as he gets bigger and stronger,” says Naito.


Joseph Cudahy Str - History

The Rise & Fall of the Omaha Stockyards

In 1955, Omaha's livestock market became the largest in the world. Everyday, thousands of cattle, hogs and sheep were shipped, first by rail and later by trucks, to Omaha's pens where they would be sold to packinghouses for slaughter or to other livestock producers for fattening or breeding stock. The numbers from the late 40s and 50s were staggering –

  • In the next to last year of World War II, there were over 7.7 million head of livestock processed through the Omaha livestock market. When Omaha took over as the number one livestock market, there were 6.7 million head processed.
  • By 1957, the livestock industry – that included the stockyard company, an astounding 19 different meatpacking companies, 40 commission firms, a special railroad just for livestock, and other companies – employed half of Omaha's workforce.
  • At its height, the stockyard itself employed 300 to 400 people with crews running 24/7.
  • In 1958, there was more than a million bushels of government grain stored at the stockyards to feed the livestock as they awaited sale.
  • Throughout the 50s, Omaha attracted livestock from around 30 states and Canada.
  • On any given market day in the mid-50s, over $2.5 million dollars worth of livestock was handled – almost $18 million worth in today's dollars.
  • Some market days, the livestock trucks would be lined up from 36th and L Streets all the way west to 72nd Street. Stockmen would have to serve as traffic cops to keep the trucks moving, and still it would take hours to unload.
  • In addition to trucks, the stockyard was serviced by at least six railroads – the Union Pacific Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Missouri Pacific Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Chicago & North Western and the Wabash. There was also an internal railroad system owned by the stockyard itself.
  • The livestock pens spread out over 250 acres – much larger than most farms at the time – dominating the landscape of South Omaha. Buyers and sellers could survey the herds from the comfort and safety of elevated walkways eight to 10 feet above the pens. They could escape the manure but not the smell.

New York City in 1880 was the nation's largest beef-producing center, and there were scores of slaughterhouses scattered across the city close to the consumers. The health inspectors hated it, but the consumers preferred their beef fresh.

At about this same time, Gustavas Swift began to revolutionize the industry by bringing refrigeration to meatpacking. Swift realized that it would be cheaper to ship dead meat east out of Chicago than live steers. For one thing, only 60 percent of the weight of any cow was useable meat. The rest was waste, so why ship it? Feed for the cattle on the trip was expensive. Many died and almost all of them lost weight.

The trick was inventing a refrigerated rail car and then building ice stations along the route to maintain ice harvested from the Great Lakes each winter.

By 1880, Swift was able to begin slaughtering and dressing cattle in Chicago and shipping beef to his first clients in Boston. Within just five years, his refrigerated beef had pulled even with shipments of live cattle to eastern markets.

One of the reasons for the success is that, by 1900, "chilled beef" was being sold for 30 percent less than beef from live cattle.

Omaha steps up. In 1883, a Wyoming cattle baron, Alexander Hamilton Swan, was coming back from a sales trip to the Chicago Stockyards when he stopped in Omaha for a break. He must have thought it would be a lot easier to ship cattle to Omaha – probably just a day's train trip from Wyoming – than all the way to Chicago. So, he talked with six Omaha businesspeople, including John A. Creighton who had helped his brother Edward build the first transcontinental telegraph line alongside the Union Pacific. Swan convinced the businesspeople that a livestock market in Omaha would be a good idea, and a year later building began.

Over the next 70 years, the Omaha livestock market grew to rival Chicago.

A young Tom Hoffman started working in the Omaha Stockyards in 1955 – the same year that the record was set for the largest single day "run" of cattle through the yards. "It was bedlam keeping track of 53,000 cattle on a Monday," Tom says. "But for a young man, like myself, working in the stockyards, all I saw was one animal with four legs that had to be watered, fed, weighed, kept track of, moved from here to there. It was glorious bedlam!"

The heyday continued for the Omaha Stockyards for a few more years. But in 1967, the number of livestock brought to Omaha dropped precipitously. Iowa Beef Processors (IBP) had opened up packing plants closer to the livestock producers and was buying directly from them. In addition, the old "Big Four" packinghouses – like Swift, Armour, Cudahy or Wilson, all of who had packing plants next to the Omaha Stockyards – saw their market shares decline, so they weren't buying as many head from Omaha Stockyards.

The late 60s sounded the death knell for Omaha.

Written by Bill Ganzel, the Ganzel Group. First published in 2007. A partial bibliography of sources is here.


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