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Machigonne SP-1043 - History

Machigonne SP-1043 - History


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Machigonne

(SP-1043: t. 425; 1. 136'6"; b. 29'; dr. 8'; s. 12 k.; a.
2 1-pdrs.)

The second Machigonne (SP-1043), formerly passenger steamer Dida, was built by Nealle, Levy & Co., Philadelphia, in 1907; operated by the Casco Bay and Harpswell Line until chartered by the Navy 2 October 1917; and commissioned 15 May 1918.

Machigonne transported men and supplies between Boston and Bumpkin Island Training Station, during World War 1. She was sold to Boston, Nahant & Pines Steamboat Co. 29 May 1919. Renamed Hook Mountain in 1930, she continued in merchant service until 1941.


HMCS Grizzly

HMCS Grizzly was an armed yacht acquired by the Royal Canadian Navy during World War II for coastal patrol and anti-submarine defence. Constructed in 1909 as Machigonne, a yacht for William L. Douglas, the vessel was purchased by the United States Navy in 1917 for use as a patrol ship on the United States East Coast during World War I and named USS Machigonne (SP-507). Following the end of the war, Machigonne was demobilised and returned to service as a yacht.

At the onset of World War II, the Royal Canadian Navy sought capable vessels for port defence, and finding few in Canadian hands, went south to American ports and purchased suitable ships there. Machigonne was discovered and acquired. However, a lack of familiarity with Machigonne ' s propulsion system led to it being burnt out before entering service. Though commissioned as HMCS Grizzly, the armed yacht was not given the modifications that other Canadian armed yachts were and spent the majority of the war anchored in the passages into the harbour at Prince Rupert, British Columbia as a guard ship. By June 1944, Grizzly was no longer considered safe and was sold for scrap to the Capital Iron and Metal Company of Victoria, British Columbia in December.


Restoration

In 1990, the by-now dilapidated Yankee was bought by a private citizen, Jim Gallagher, who towed it to Pier 25, Tribeca, Manhattan, where he began working on its restoration. In an unusual arrangement, Gallagher was permitted by the local authorities to live on the boat in order to continue with his work. To help pay for the job, Gallagher rented the boat out to weddings and parties. The vessel was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. [ 2 ] [ 9 ]

In 2003, Gallagher sold the boat to new owners who pledged to continue with the restoration work. [ 4 ] In 2006 the boat was moved to Hoboken, New Jersey while the local council carried out an upgrade to Pier 25. [ 10 ] Although operational, the boat is apparently not used for actual voyages since it lacks a seaworthiness certificate. [ 4 ]

Yankee is one of several vessels built by Neafie & Levy to be either still operational or operating until very recently. Another Neafie & Levy vessel that is still operational and on the National Register of Historic Places is the tugboat Jupiter. A third vessel, the tugboat Tuff-E-Nuff (originally the Thomas Cunningham Sr.), built in 1895, was remarkably still in commercial service in its original role as of May 2007. [ 11 ]


Restoration [ edit | edit source ]

In 1990, the by-now dilapidated Yankee was bought by a private citizen, Jim Gallagher, who towed it to Pier 25, Tribeca, Manhattan, where he began working on its restoration. In an unusual arrangement, Gallagher was permitted by the local authorities to live on the boat in order to continue with his work. To help pay for the job, Gallagher rented the boat out to weddings and parties. The vessel was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. Ε] Ζ]

In 2003, Gallagher sold the boat to new owners who pledged to continue with the restoration work. ΐ] In 2006 the boat was moved to Hoboken, New Jersey while the local council carried out an upgrade to Pier 25. Η] Although operational, the boat is apparently not used for actual voyages since it lacks a seaworthiness certificate. ΐ]

Yankee is one of several vessels built by Neafie & Levy to be either still operational or operating until very recently. Another Neafie & Levy vessel that is still operational is the tugboat Jupiter. A third vessel, the tugboat Tuff-E-Nuff (originally the Thomas Cunningham Sr.), built in 1895, was remarkably still in commercial service in its original role as of May 2007. ⎖]


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Restoration

In 1990, the by-now dilapidated Yankee was bought by a private citizen, Jim Gallagher, who towed it to Pier 25, Tribeca, Manhattan, where he began working on its restoration. In an unusual arrangement, Gallagher was permitted by the local authorities to live on the boat in order to continue with his work. To help pay for the job, Gallagher rented the boat out to weddings and parties. The vessel was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992.

In 2003, Gallagher sold the boat to new owners who pledged to continue with the restoration work. In 2006 the boat was moved to Hoboken, New Jersey while the local council carried out an upgrade to Pier 25. Although operational, the boat is apparently not used for actual voyages since it lacks a seaworthiness certificate.

Yankee is one of several vessels built by Neafie & Levy to be either still operational or operating until very recently. Another Neafie & Levy vessel that is still operational is the tugboat Jupiter. A third vessel, the tugboat Tuff-E-Nuff (originally the Thomas Cunningham Sr.), built in 1895, was remarkably still in commercial service in its original role as of May 2007.

In 2003 Yankee was bought by Richard and Victoria MacKenzie-Childs, and moved to a dock in Red Hook, Brooklyn in 2013. While interior repair and restoration work is ongoing, the ship is in need of drydock space/funding to have its hull inspected, repaired, and deemed seaworthy again.

In 2018, while in drydock in Staten Island after further hull work, the Yankee was listed for sale by Franklin-Ruttan: "The oldest existing Ellis Island Ferry. Built in 1907, acquired by Victoria & Richard Mackenzie-Childs in 2003 and renovated with their creative touch. 150 foot historic vessel listed on National Register of historic places. Currently configured as residence with 11 bedrooms. Potential as public exhibit, Event Venue / Restaurant. "Either afloat upon the waters, OR mounted upon the land, or cresting a building like an elegant. Crown! A most intriguing vista from without and from within. Ship has undergone hull restoration in 2017. $2.37M."


Machigonne SP-1043 - History

The first attempt at settlement in what would become the Port Bowen area ended in disaster. France founded the settlement of Machigonne in 1623 on the Cape Elizabeth peninsula, hoping to capitalize on the region's fur trade. The location provided easy access for ships, but suffered from harsh winters and occasional floods. Machigonne was abandoned only three years later. It would take another nine years for France to try again, this time placing their Casco settlement 10 miles north and slightly further inland. This time, the settlement took hold and flourished. In honor of the previous colony, Casco was renamed Machigonne in 1637.

Machigonne flourished for the next thirty years, growing into an important shipping port and the center of commerce for much of the Acadia territory. It was officially claimed by King Charles II in 1669 as the region came under British rule. It was then granted to James Duke of York as part of the new Cornwall County, and renamed Port Bowen later that year.

The period from 1675 through 1697 saw two wars ravage Cornwall County. The first was King Philip's War, in which Port Bowen was all but destroyed by Native American warriors under the command of Metacomet (called King Philip by the English). Fittingly, the treaty which officially ended hostilities in 1678 was signed in the new courthouse at Port Bowen, newly rebuilt that year. The second was King William's War, starting 1689 and lasting until the end of the Nine Years' War. As the economic center of northern New England, Port Bowen again saw heavy fighting on multiple occasions. It fared better than in King Philip's War, however, and avoided a complete sacking. After the Treaty of Ryswick was signed in 1697, Port Bowen shifted quickly away from a wartime mentality and resumed its maritime and commercial activity.

The next fifty years were prosperous for Port Bowen. New England's steady expansion and the constant demands of the fur trade made ship building ever more lucrative, especially given England's holdings in Port Royal and Newfoundland after 1713. Furthermore, the city's proximity to French-controlled Acadia led to a cultural diversity unknown in the rest of New England. It also led to high tensions on the eve of the French and Indian War.

Fighting again erupted 1754 in Virginia, and quickly spread throughout the French and English colonies. The same racial diversity that caused tension and division before the war likely ensured Port Bowen's survival during its course, as both sides had citizens living in the city. This led to a series of hand offs between the French and English forces during the war, allowing the city's population to remain and simply changeling leadership. This was a significant departure from England's policy of deporting French speakers from their captured territory during the war, and led to an influx of French colonists eager to avoid being shipped away. After the war's conclusion, many of these Frenchmen remained in Port Bowen. They slowly concentrated in the northern part of the city, forming the French District which remains even today.

Peace was short-lived after the French and Indian War. As the American Revolution began 12 years later, the citizens of Port Bowen assumed that their city would suffer little damage, as it had in the previous conflict. For a single year, this held true: Port Bowen's loyalists prevented a widespread revolutionary movement among the populace, which kept the city relatively safe. Then, in 1776, Cpt. Henry Mowat of the British Navy assaulted Port Bowen anyway and left it a scorched ruin. This unforgivable betrayal galvanized New England against the British and resulted in a surge of support for Revolutionary forces.

Port Bowen remained in British hands until 1781, when it was finally recaptured. In the intervening years, what remained of the city was converted into a stockade fort. When the revolution ended in 1783, the fort was summarily torn down. The city was rebuilt over the next 20 years.

The War of 1812 was much kinder to Port Bowen. It never once faced an invading army – the closest occupation was of Castine by Sir John Coape Sherbrooke. Instead, the city was a hub of smuggling and illegal trade between the U.S. and the British.

In 1820, five years after the War of 1812 was ended, Maine was declared the 23rd state of the Union. Port Bowen became its capitol city and steadily gained in political clout. 1833 saw the founding of the Northeastern College of Pharmacy, the first higher learning institution in the state.

In 1910, the city experienced its first major industrial shift: pulp and paper finally began to overcome textiles and quarrying as the city's most lucrative pursuits. At the same time, universities and colleges were becoming more and more important as commercial investments, and the population was booming.


Restoration

In 1990, the by-now dilapidated Yankee was bought by a private citizen, Jim Gallagher, who towed it to Pier 25, Tribeca, Manhattan, where he began working on its restoration. In an unusual arrangement, Gallagher was permitted by the local authorities to live on the boat in order to continue with his work. To help pay for the job, Gallagher rented the boat out to weddings and parties. The vessel was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. [2] [9]

In 2003, Gallagher sold the boat to new owners who pledged to continue with the restoration work. [4] In 2006 the boat was moved to Hoboken, New Jersey while the local council carried out an upgrade to Pier 25. [10] Although operational, the boat is apparently not used for actual voyages since it lacks a seaworthiness certificate. [4]

Yankee is one of several vessels built by Neafie & Levy to be either still operational or operating until very recently. Another Neafie & Levy vessel that is still operational is the tugboat Jupiter. A third vessel, the tugboat Tuff-E-Nuff (originally the Thomas Cunningham Sr.), built in 1895, was remarkably still in commercial service in its original role as of May 2007. [11]

In 2003 Yankee was bought by Richard and Victoria MacKenzie-Childs, and moved to a dock in Red Hook, Brooklyn in 2013. While interior repair and restoration work is ongoing, the ship is in need of drydock space/funding to have its hull inspected, repaired, and deemed seaworthy again.

In 2018, while in drydock in Staten Island after further hull work, the Yankee was listed for sale by Franklin-Ruttan: "The oldest existing Ellis Island Ferry. Built in 1907, acquired by Victoria & Richard Mackenzie-Childs in 2003 and renovated with their creative touch. 150 foot historic vessel listed on National Register of historic places. Currently configured as residence with 11 bedrooms. Potential as public exhibit, Event Venue / Restaurant. "Either afloat upon the waters, OR mounted upon the land, or cresting a building like an elegant. Crown! A most intriguing vista from without and from within. Ship has undergone hull restoration in 2017. $2.37M." [12]


Native American Occupation and Relations

At the time of European contact in the sixteenth century, people speaking an Eastern dialect of the Wabanaki language inhabited present-day Casco Bay. A number of Treaties were negotiated and signed between the British colonies and members of the Wabanaki Confederacy in Casco Bay, including the Treaty of Casco (1678), the Treaty of Casco (1703), and Treaty of Casco Bay (1727). The latter Treaty was the result of a Conference between the British and the Abenaki in August, 1727, at which the parties agreed to uphold the terms of the 1725 Treaty of Peace and Friendship which ended Dummer's War, and to cooperate with each other in keeping the peace. Chief Loron Sagouarram, who had signed the Treaty of 1725, addressed the gathering in 1727, providing his understanding of the Treaty relationship.

American Involvement

Casco Bay is also home to abandoned military fortifications dating from the War of 1812 through World War II during World War II, Casco Bay served as an anchorage for US Navy ships. Since Casco Bay was the nearest American anchorage to the Atlantic Lend-Lease convoy routes to Britain prior to US entry into World War II, Admiral King ordered a large pool of destroyers to be stationed there for convoy escort duty in August 1941.

Machigonne Development

Machigonne was established on the 10th of April 2021 by Archie Birch a its first Commondore


Historical Landmarks

Originally called Machigonne (Great Neck) by the Native Americans who first inhabited it, the Portland peninsula was established by the British in 1632 as a trading and fishing settlement. Industry grew and Portland’s waterfront became a mecca for shipping and trading companies. The name was changed to Casco and, in 1658, to Falmouth. Local citizens renamed their town Portland in 1786, and in 1820 Maine became a state, with Portland serving as its first capital.

PORTLAND’S FORTS

Fort Preble
Fort Road, Southern Maine Technical College. Once used to guard approach to Portland Harbor.

Fort Scammel
A Civil War Fort on House Island, is an interesting tour and clambake spot. At the turn of the century, House Island served as an immigration hospital for thousands of immigrants entering America.

Fort Gorges
The octagonal stone fort visible off Portland’s Eastern Promenade can be visited by private boat. Designed in 1858 for short-range guns, the fort was soon made obsolete by the development of long-range guns and was never fired upon.

PLACES TO SEE

Portland Observatory View | Photo Credit: CFW Photography

Portland Observatory Museum
National Historic Landmark in Portland’s East End. Only remaining signal tower in America. Views, cruise ships, lighthouses, Western Mountains.

Deering Oaks Park
51-acre park was scene of 1690 battle between colonists, French and Indians. Ancient oaks dot the grounds, Rose Garden, playground, duck pond, tennis courts. Saturday Farmers Market in season.

Eastern Promenade
Neighborhood with amazing views of Casco Bay. Large grassy area is a great place to bring a book, have a picnic or play a game of Frisbee, and enjoy the boating activity on the water. There is a small beach that is open to the public.

Maine Irish Heritage Center
European style cathedral served as the center of Irish Culture for over 150 years. It now houses Maine’s Irish genealogical center and library, presenting the story of Irish history in Maine.

Custom House Wharf | Alan Lavalle

Old Port
The historic center of the original settlement is centered around its commercial port. In 1866 it suffered a disastrous fire and was rebuilt almost immediately in grand Victorian style, demonstrating the city’s economic resilience.

U.S. Customs House
Built 1868-1871. Constructed of New Hampshire granite. Elaborate interior includes painted and gilded ceilings, fine crafted woodwork and marble floors. Still in use by Customs Service and the Coast Guard.

Portland Museum of Art
Charles Shipman Payson wing built 1979-83. Henry N. Cobb of I.M. Pei, architect. Contemporary Post- Modern, reflects a traditional architectural vocabulary. Built of locally-made brick with granite string courses.

City Hall | Photo Credit: Chris Lawrence

Portland City Hall
Second Renaissance Revival, 1909-1912. Designed by Carrere and Hastings of New York.

Western Promenade
Spectacular views, 175 feet above sea level, Portland’s Western Promenade dates from the turn of the century and exhibits the city’s well preserved Victorian residences.

TIMELINE

1632 – English settlers inhabited the Portland Peninsula, then called by the Indian name Machigonne. The name was changed to Casco and, in 1658, to Falmouth.

1652 – The entire Casco Bay area became part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

1675 – Area completely destroyed by Indians during King Philip’s War.

1690 – Fort Loyal destroyed by French and Indians.

1775 – British warships under the command of the notorious Captain Henry Mowatt shelled and burned the city of Falmouth.

1776 – After the Revolutionary War, Falmouth was established as a commercial port and began rapid growth as a shipping center.

1786 – Local citizens renamed their town Portland.

1820 – Maine became a state and Portland its first Capital.

1820s – Portland recovers from the Embargo Act and War of 1812. Maine boats could trade all over the world.

1823 – First steamship from Boston beginning of regular passenger service between the two cities.

1852 – Commercial Street opened to connect rail and water transportation networks.

1866 – The Great Fire of 1866, started by a 4th of July celebration, destroyed most of the public buildings, half the churches, and hundreds of houses. The city was rebuilt with brick Victorian style and early 20th century houses, now seen throughout Portland.

1941 – Portland became the home port of US North American Fleet during World War II.

1961 – Beginning of the preservation movement in Portland.

1970s – The Old Port became an area of artist’s studios and a lively retail center.

1980s – Emphasis placed on preserving the waterfront for active commercial marine activities.

1990s – Revitalization of the city’s major artery, Congress St., and establishment of downtown Arts District.

2001 – Passenger rail service between Boston and Portland revived.

2012 – Maine, Maryland, and Washington became the first states to legalize same-sex marriage through popular vote.

2014 – Ferry service resumes between Portland and Yarmouth, Nova Scotia


Watch the video: Portland Maine -Old Orchard Beach and Casco Bay Ferry Lines (May 2022).