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Reading in the Refectory: monastic practice in England from the eleventh to the thirteenth centuries

Reading in the Refectory: monastic practice in England from the eleventh to the thirteenth centuries


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Reading in the Refectory: monastic practice in England from the eleventh to the thirteenth centuries

Lecture by Teresa Webber

Given at the School of Advanced Study, University of London, on February 18, 2010

John Coffin Memorial Palaeography Lecture – “Reading in the Refectory: monastic practice in England from the eleventh to the thirteenth centuries”

The readings delivered to monastic communities each day in the refectory, and the books used for this purpose, have received comparatively little detailed attention. This lecture will examine the surviving evidence and explain the principles underlying the selection of texts for the readings. It hopes to bring a new perspective to the history of monastic book production and the formation of book collections in England in the central middle ages.

Dr Teresa Webber, FSA, FRHistS, is a Fellow of Trinity College Cambridge, and University Senior Lecturer in Palaeography and Codicology in the Faculty of History. She has published Scribes and Scholars at Salisbury Cathedral c.1075-c.1125 (1992), and co-edited The Libraries of the Augustinian Canons, Corpus of British Medieval Library Catalogues, 6 (British Library/British Academy, 1998) and with Elizabeth Leedham-Green Vol I of the Cambridge History of Libraries in Britain and Ireland.


Watch the video: The Soul of Early Irish Monasticism with Bernard McGinn (June 2022).


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